For IALU

Our Permanent Collection of CC Member's Favorite Recipes....
User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Sat Jan 03, 2009 2:10 pm

iamlookingup wrote:Can everyone please start labeling their recipes with Easy, Intermediate, or wayinoverialushead?


:lol:
We've been putting in translations, explanations, and phonetic pronunciations.
You know, like pot-au-feu was explained as a Boiled Dinner, and dozens of places we not only did the translations but we provided explanations of what it is, where it came from, at times the history of it.

Point to some things so we can change the errors of our ways.

User avatar
Fatherducque
Posts: 21818
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:26 pm
Location: Je suis Charlie
Contact:

Re: For IALU

Post by Fatherducque » Sat Jan 03, 2009 2:27 pm

iamlookingup wrote:Can everyone please start labeling their recipes with Easy, Intermediate, or wayinoverialushead?


:lol:
Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich
(Intermediate)
:lol:

IALU....just do it! So what if it doesn't turn out the first time???????? That is what Mac 'n' cheese is all about!

Go try the chicken and sausage gumbo! Once you get past the roux, you are home free! And everyone will think you are a master Chef!

Ask Abbi if the Jambalaya was hard? She got it on the first try ( I think).

Both of those are really cheap to make. Only a pound of the cheapest smoked sausage is really needed to make a gallon or so. You can even use less in a jam.

Stop doubting yourself!!!!!

User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Sat Jan 03, 2009 2:48 pm

Man does not live by Cajun alone.................

User avatar
Pixie
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posts: 4598
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:56 pm

Re: For IALU

Post by Pixie » Sat Jan 03, 2009 2:59 pm

Fatherducque wrote:
iamlookingup wrote:Can everyone please start labeling their recipes with Easy, Intermediate, or wayinoverialushead?


:lol:
Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich
(Intermediate)
:lol:

IALU....just do it! So what if it doesn't turn out the first time???????? That is what Mac 'n' cheese is all about!

Go try the chicken and sausage gumbo! Once you get past the roux, you are home free! And everyone will think you are a master Chef!

Ask Abbi if the Jambalaya was hard? She got it on the first try ( I think).

Both of those are really cheap to make. Only a pound of the cheapest smoked sausage is really needed to make a gallon or so. You can even use less in a jam.

Stop doubting yourself!!!!!

:lolh: :clap2: :lolh:

User avatar
Pixie
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posts: 4598
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:56 pm

Re: For IALU

Post by Pixie » Sat Jan 03, 2009 3:00 pm

iamlookingup wrote:Can everyone please start labeling their recipes with Easy, Intermediate, or wayinoverialushead?


:lol:
:lolh: Of course I will!!!!!!!!!!!!!! :cheer:

User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Sat Jan 03, 2009 3:17 pm

iamlookingup wrote:Can everyone please start labeling their recipes with Easy, Intermediate, or wayinoverialushead?


:lol:

Well, on a scale of 10 (10 being a Pro) where woukld you say you are?

1 to 2 very inexperienced
3 to 4 occassional cook
5 to 6 Cook most of the time
7 to 8 Accomplished Cook
9 to 10 Professional

User avatar
Fatherducque
Posts: 21818
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:26 pm
Location: Je suis Charlie
Contact:

Re: For IALU

Post by Fatherducque » Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:28 pm

falvegas wrote:Man does not live by Cajun alone.................
Still testing that theory... :)

Actually we enjoy a lot of southeast Asian (Nonya) style and Indian meals too.

It is just that (non-gourmet) Cajun and Creole style cooking is sooooooooooooooo cheap and easy, but it seems that a lot of folks are intimidated by it. When you whip up a couple of gallons of gumbo on a rainy Saturday, you can feast that night, set some aside for later in the week, and freeze up the rest in butter dishes for quick meals later.

I was also thinking the novelty of a gumbo or jambalaya might appeal to IALU's youngsters.

User avatar
Johnny 99
Formerly known as "kad"
Posts: 12575
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2006 4:32 pm
Location: I will never live for the sake of another man, nor ask another man to live for mine.

Re: For IALU

Post by Johnny 99 » Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:41 pm

Fatherducque wrote:
Peanut Butter and Jelly Sandwich
(Intermediate)
:lol:
You spelled that wrong.

It's SANGwhich.

:mrgreen:

User avatar
DSMBaptist
Perma-Newb™
Posts: 6766
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2006 3:27 pm
Location: Destroying the New World Order and putting NEOCONS in their place!
Contact:

Re: For IALU

Post by DSMBaptist » Sat Jan 03, 2009 6:57 pm

iamlookingup wrote:Can everyone please start labeling their recipes with Easy, Intermediate, or wayinoverialushead?


:lol:
But all of those terms are relative. What I might call "Easy" might be considered by others as "wayinoverialushead", and vice versa. :headscratch:

User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Sat Jan 03, 2009 9:45 pm

iamlookingup wrote:
DSMBaptist wrote:
iamlookingup wrote:Can everyone please start labeling their recipes with Easy, Intermediate, or wayinoverialushead?


:lol:
But all of those terms are relative. What I might call "Easy" might be considered by others as "wayinoverialushead", and vice versa. :headscratch:
phpBB [video]
:lol: I know that, DSM...but you know, many cooking websites do rate their recipes that way for novices like me. ;)


But even so...I really was just being a smart aleck. ;)
Here's the point iamlookingup ...
Everyone in here is an 'Amateur'. What this is about is sharing information and methods through which we all gain from each other. This isn't an 'I'm smarter than you' confrontation like the 'political posts' in here where the 'predators' want to impress everyone with what they think they know, and 'Trash' those that don't know or don't agree with them.

The only requirements here are that we want to learn about cooking and share recipes, and that we care enough about each other to give what we can, responding to our needs, never putting anyone down.
Last edited by falvegas on Sat Jan 03, 2009 10:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Sat Jan 03, 2009 10:11 pm

iamlookingup wrote:Oh, I've NEVER felt like any of you would put people down! No way!

The problem is on my end. As I've said...I get overwhelmed easily.

For example...tonight I made a potato recipe that called for the potatoes to be pared and sliced. Well...I know what sliced
means, but I had to guess that "pared" means "skinned"? Stuff like that.

I never set foot in the kitchen before I was married, and have always kinda winged it (I only have one more pan in
my closet today than I did the day I got married, and that's really sad!) so when a recipe says anything beyond "boil water"
or "open a can", I get nervous. :embarrassed:

I certainly wasn't implying anything otherwise...I'm sorry if I was misunderstood.

Go back to your regularly scheduled programs... :embarrassed:
Its OK. Use us Girl, use us to death. Ask away, ask what you think may be stupid any time you want. We may not have the answer but there's enough experience in here where we can band together and find it. That's really what this post should be about.

User avatar
College Boy
You can call me College Professor Boy
Posts: 14834
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 2:29 pm
Location: Seasons don't fear the reaper. Nor do the wind, the sun, or the rain.
Contact:

Re: For IALU

Post by College Boy » Sat Jan 03, 2009 10:27 pm

iamlookingup wrote::hmm: So...does "pared" mean "peeled"? :dunno:

I want to know the same thing.

-Mike

User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Sat Jan 03, 2009 10:39 pm

iamlookingup wrote::hmm: So...does "pared" mean "peeled"? :dunno:
You're not the first to be confused by these two phrases. Most say there is absolutely no difference. I'll give you my take on it for whatever it's worth, and others in here can likely expand on it or correct it,

Paring, as I recall, was really related to Apples or a like fruit, like those hired to Pare and Core Apples. Peeling it seems applies more to thin skinned vegetables and fruits. In the end it's semantics, you have to take the skin off.

I like the French. When they say make a Mirapois or a Beurre blanc, it's always the same. When Latins say make a Sofrito, there's a zillion different ones. The English language is extensive but it has a host of Colloquialisms and double meanings.

I'd say what you're confused about is well founded...but they're the same thing.

User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Sun Jan 04, 2009 3:16 am

iamlookingup wrote:Well, obviously a dictionary could come in handy, but when you're in the kitchen, and your hands are
busy, you don't usually go looking for the dictionary! :lol:
I know, been there, done that. I bake bread often and my lap top is usually on the counter. But the last thing I want to do is weld the Keys together with bread dough on my fingers.

But the New Better Homes cookbook has a 'Terms' section in the front. It defines Peeling & Paring both as removing the outer skin or covering. However 'Peel' is also the name for the outer covering.

As you gain experience you won't have to refer to recipes quite as often, you'll just know what to do

User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Sun Jan 04, 2009 12:16 pm

iamlookingup wrote:
falvegas wrote:... New Better Homes cookbook has a 'Terms' section in the front...
I'm probably going to need to get some kind of "how to" book.

One of the things I absolutely know about myself, is that I'm a very "visual" learner. I have to see things before I can replicate them.

For example...I got my degree in Math (concentration in C.S.), yet I can't add two numbers in my head. I MUST write problems down
before I can solve them. :dunno:

That's why I love youtube...that's how I learned how to tie a necktie for my son. :)
I sent 12 DVD's to my Niece, all recipes from video... She's in the same position you're in...
I amassed over 200 Recipes in a little over a year, Copied them to my DVD recorder from broadcast TV. I edited them and put them on 12 DVD's, commercials n'stuff edited out. All were from the very best Chefs and test Kitchens, some recipes, some methods, some whole menus. She used them to learn the terms, develop method skills, and for recipes.

I gave her a master index so she knew what was on what DVD and where.

User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Sun Jan 04, 2009 1:27 pm

iamlookingup wrote:
falvegas wrote:Braising is cooking the meat (covered) at low temperature (like 250 to 325) for a very long time in water about 1/4 to 1/3 the way up the Roast or piece of meat. It can also be done on the Stove-Top. This is usually done for Tough Cuts of meat. Examples of this in here are the Oso Bucco, and the Braised Short Ribs posted in here recently.

Poaching is simmering the food 'fully' or 'partially' covered in water or a liquid.

Someone in here will jump on me for this but I'll tell you how I poach a Chicken
** I throw the unfrozen Chicken (wrapping cover and all), right from the market, into a Stock Pot 3/4 full of Water. Bring it to a Simmer, and cook about 1 Hour. It's done when a meat thermometer shoved into the center cavity (right through the package) reads 155 to 160 F Degrees. Remove it, cool it to the touch, pull the meat off in chunks, and shred the chicken into a storage container or use.

Throw the carcass back into the pot, giblets and all, with stock vegetables, and simmer low for 2 to 3 hours. You now have a Chicken Stock. Freeze it in jars for soup, gravy, sauces ect....
Really? You can do that?
Yup! I do rinse the package off first. After all, if something works and saves time, use it.
Sometimes I'll wrap the packaged chicken in an additional plastic bag (the ones I steal from the market), suck the air from it, and tie it off with a tie wrap before putting it in the pot. The original package will likely fill with air and split. No big deal.

Sometimes if I'm going to use the chicken for say, Enchiladas or Soft Tacos, I'll put a bunch of Cilantro and Chilies inside the Bag and Poach it...to flavor the chicken.

User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Sun Jan 04, 2009 1:53 pm

iamlookingup wrote:
falvegas wrote:...Yup! I do rinse the package off first. After all, if something works and saves time, use it.
Sometimes I'll wrap the packaged chicken in an additional plastic bag (the ones I steal from the market), suck the air from it, and tie it off with a tie wrap before putting it in the pot. The original package will likely fill with air and split. No big deal.

Sometimes if I'm going to use the chicken for say, Enchiladas or Soft Tacos, I'll put a bunch of Cilantro and Chilies inside the Bag and Poach it...to flavor the chicken.
So, let me get this straight...do you open the bag first? Or do you leave it sealed? Obviously, if you're gonna add cilantro and chilies, you need to open it, right? And if you do open it, is that when you put it in the grocery store bag?
Nope, I never open the original package, it'll leak anyway, and it'll split about half way through poaching. I put the herbs in the second bag, and seal it. Must suck the air out, as much as possible.

Recommend you tell your Hubby you want a book for valentines day. There's a zillion out there but this one would be excellent for you:
"Better Homes and Gardens" New Cook Book. The one I have is the 75th Anniversary Edition 2005. There are newer editions of that book, I've seen them all over the place. Why: because it has Cooking Methods clearly defined with pictures. Cooking Terms described. It describes and shows pictures of all the fruits & vegetables, cuts of meat, herbs and when to use them. It tells you and provides pictures of all the utensils and pans you'll need (over time), how to set a table, how to entertain. And there's 500 pages of recipes most of what you'll likely need for the next 10 years. many of the recipes describe complex methods and show pictures of 'How'.

User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Sun Jan 04, 2009 2:07 pm

iamlookingup wrote:I'm sure my DH would LOVE to buy me a cookbook for my birthday. :ialu: It had better be wrapped
in diamonds!


:lol: Actually, I got that book as a wedding gift (20 years ago), but alas, can't find it. :cry:

Hey, go for it....tell him 'F Clarity', 3 to 4 carrots.

User avatar
DSMBaptist
Perma-Newb™
Posts: 6766
Joined: Mon Oct 30, 2006 3:27 pm
Location: Destroying the New World Order and putting NEOCONS in their place!
Contact:

Re: For IALU

Post by DSMBaptist » Sun Jan 04, 2009 3:50 pm

iamlookingup wrote:

But even so...I really was just being a smart aleck. ;)
Relax...I know you were, my dear Queen! ;)

But...I gotta cover all the bases, all the same! :wink:

User avatar
Pixie
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posts: 4598
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:56 pm

Re: For IALU

Post by Pixie » Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:00 pm

Image

Image

It's a big heavy casserole dish that you can use on the stove or in the oven. You can make stews, soups, chilis, breads, casseroles. etc. in it.

These are cast iron pots with an enamel coating... my favorite!!!!!!

I posted a couple of pictures for you! It's a great pot to have!!!!!!!!!!!
Last edited by Pixie on Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.

User avatar
Pixie
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posts: 4598
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:56 pm

Re: For IALU

Post by Pixie » Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:00 pm

Hmmmmm, I can't see the pictures... can you??????

User avatar
ConsrvYank1
The DLH specializing in Broken Kneecaps
Posts: 19546
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 4:47 am
Location: Connecticut Yankee
Contact:

Re: For IALU

Post by ConsrvYank1 » Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:03 pm

Pixie wrote:Hmmmmm, I can't see the pictures... can you??????
No

User avatar
Pixie
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posts: 4598
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:56 pm

Re: For IALU

Post by Pixie » Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:17 pm

Okay, I'll try again!

User avatar
Pixie
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posts: 4598
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:56 pm

Re: For IALU

Post by Pixie » Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:22 pm

I posted two... one oval that's in yellow and one round that's in red!

User avatar
ConsrvYank1
The DLH specializing in Broken Kneecaps
Posts: 19546
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 4:47 am
Location: Connecticut Yankee
Contact:

Re: For IALU

Post by ConsrvYank1 » Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:24 pm

Pixie wrote:I posted two... one oval that's in yellow and one round that's in red!
Okay, I can see them. My mother used to have one back in the 50's. It was oval, gray, and I seem to remember it had kind of a bumpy outer surface.

User avatar
Pixie
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posts: 4598
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:56 pm

Re: For IALU

Post by Pixie » Tue Jan 13, 2009 4:34 pm

ConsrvYank1 wrote:
Pixie wrote:I posted two... one oval that's in yellow and one round that's in red!
Okay, I can see them. My mother used to have one back in the 50's. It was oval, gray, and I seem to remember it had kind of a bumpy outer surface.


Yep, that's exactly what it was! My mom had a big cast iron one that wasn't coated and had to be seasoned and it had a handle!!!!!!!!! The one my mom had and the two pictured are very heavy! They last generations!!!!!!!!!!

You can use them for so many things they are wonderful pots!!!!!!!!

User avatar
falvegas
Posts: 5488
Joined: Mon Jun 23, 2008 12:14 am

Re: For IALU

Post by falvegas » Tue Jan 13, 2009 6:20 pm

Pixie wrote:
ConsrvYank1 wrote:
Pixie wrote:I posted two... one oval that's in yellow and one round that's in red!
Okay, I can see them. My mother used to have one back in the 50's. It was oval, gray, and I seem to remember it had kind of a bumpy outer surface.


Yep, that's exactly what it was! My mom had a big cast iron one that wasn't coated and had to be seasoned and it had a handle!!!!!!!!! The one my mom had and the two pictured are very heavy! They last generations!!!!!!!!!!

You can use them for so many things they are wonderful pots!!!!!!!!
The best. Iron has excellent heat retentivity, and distribution.

User avatar
Fatherducque
Posts: 21818
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:26 pm
Location: Je suis Charlie
Contact:

Re: For IALU

Post by Fatherducque » Tue Jan 13, 2009 7:53 pm

iamlookingup wrote:What's a dutch oven?
Lodge is less expensive than the ones Pixie posted. Not as good, but likely good enough. Enamel is nice, but can chip if you drop the lid on the pot hard. Cast Iron is indestructable.

http://www.lodgemfg.com/Logic-dutch-oven.asp

http://www.lodgemfg.com/enamel_dutch_oven.asp

They run $40-$70 from Cabelas.

User avatar
Pixie
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Posts: 4598
Joined: Tue Jul 29, 2008 1:56 pm

Re: For IALU

Post by Pixie » Tue Jan 13, 2009 8:29 pm

Fatherducque wrote:
iamlookingup wrote:What's a dutch oven?
Lodge is less expensive than the ones Pixie posted. Not as good, but likely good enough. Enamel is nice, but can chip if you drop the lid on the pot hard. Cast Iron is indestructable.

http://www.lodgemfg.com/Logic-dutch-oven.asp

http://www.lodgemfg.com/enamel_dutch_oven.asp

They run $40-$70 from Cabelas.
Fatherducque!!!!!!!!!!!!

Lodge is VERY NICE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! It's what my mother had and my sister now has it!!!!!!!!!!! It has a handle and it will be handed down to my niece!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The only thing is you have to season them and that can be a bit of work. That's all!!!!!!!!!!!! But it's a wonderful brand! And, for cast iron you can't find better!!!!!!!!!!

:wave: :wave: :wave:

User avatar
Fatherducque
Posts: 21818
Joined: Sun Oct 29, 2006 3:26 pm
Location: Je suis Charlie
Contact:

Re: For IALU

Post by Fatherducque » Wed Jan 14, 2009 8:12 am

Maybe I did it wrong, but if I recall, seasoning was really easy. All my cast iron was seasoned at least ten years ago, so I forget the details.

Post Reply