Shrimp Etouffee

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falvegas
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Shrimp Etouffee

Post by falvegas » Thu Mar 01, 2018 11:37 am

SHRIMP ETOUFFEE
This is a Shrimp Etouffee made pretty close to many originals in Louisiana. It's made with a Dark Roux however I have made this with a lighter Roux, AND it can be made Simple using a 'Slurry' of Flour & Water. Etouffee is also often made with Crawfish and I've had it with Duck.
INGREDIENTS
FISH STOCK
• 1-1/2 to 2 quarts Cold Water
• 1 Medium Onion, unpeeled and quartered
• 1 Garlic Clove, unpeeled and quartered
• 1 stalk Celery
• Shrimp Shells, from 2 pounds shrimp
SEASONING MIX
• 2 teaspoons Sea Salt
• 1 teaspoons ground Red Pepper (Cayenne)
• 1/2 teaspoon ground White Pepper
• 1 teaspoon ground Black Pepper
• 1/2 teaspoon Basil or 2 -tsp Chopped Fresh
• 1⁄2 teaspoon Thyme or 2 -tsp Chopped Fresh
• 1 Cup chopped Onion
• 1 Cup chopped Celery with Leaves
• 1 Cup chopped Green & Red Bell Pepper
ROUX AND GRAVY
• 7 Tablespoons [4 Tbs-VegOil + 3 Tbs -Butter]
• 2/3 Cup Flour
• 3 Cups Fish Stock from above
FINISH
• 6 -8 tablespoons unsalted butter to your taste
• 2 Lbs Medium or Large Shrimp, peeled
• 1 Cup very finely chopped Green Onion
• 1 Cup Fish Stock (per above)
• 4 cups hot Cooked Rice
ETOUFFEE DIRECTIONS
1.) Fish Stock: Combine all ingredients and bring to boil; simmer for 4-8 hours, the longer the better; replenish water as needed to keep one quart of liquid in the pot. Less if adding some of “own Stock’. 2.) NOTE: a stock simmered 20-30 minutes is better than water. 3.) NOTE: Can also simmer the shells from the peeled shrimp and skip the vegetables.
4.) Seasoning Mix: In a small bowl thoroughly combine all dry ingredients; set aside; Combine chopped vegetables in separate bowl and set aside.
5.) Roux: Heat the oil over high heat in a large, heavy skillet until it begins to smoke, about 4 minutes; use a Long Handled Whisk and gradually mix in flour; cook and stir constantly until roux is dark red-brown, (3-5 minutes); don't let roux scorch OR get it on your skin! 6.) Remove from heat - stir in the combined vegetables and ONE TABLESPOON of the dry seasoning with a wooden spoon; stir for 5 minutes while the roux cools down.
7.) Gravy: Bring the fish stock to a boil in a 2 quart saucepan; gradually whisk in roux and stir until incorporated. 8.) Reduce heat to low; continue stirring and cook another 2 minutes, until flour taste is gone; if any of the gravy scorches, don't scrape that part of the pan; remove from heat and set aside.
9.) Finish W/Shrimp: Using a 4 quart saucepan, melt 3-4 T butter over medium heat; stir in shrimp and green onions and sauté 1 minute, stirring constantly. 10.) Add the remaining 3-4 T butter, Fish Stock and gravy; shake the pan rather than stir until the butter is melted and mixed into sauce, about 4-6 minutes. 11.) Add remaining seasoning mix [from #6] ; stir well and remove from heat; if sauce starts separating, add a couple of TBS stock or water and shake pan until it combines.
12.) Plate rice in a ring and Pour Etouffee into Center; serve immediately.

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Flyingcloud
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Re: Shrimp Etouffee

Post by Flyingcloud » Thu Mar 01, 2018 12:23 pm

:headscratch: "1 Garlic Clove, unpeeled and quartered"

I don't understand, don't peel it, quarter it.

A Garlic Clove looks like this:

Image

And if one peels it, and it is a good idea to peel it, the pieces of a garlic clove looks like this:

Image

I could understand directions which said: Peel, then quarter the pieces of one garlic clove.

I trim the little dry shaggy ends off of the pieces as well as peeling the clove.

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falvegas
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Re: Shrimp Etouffee

Post by falvegas » Thu Mar 01, 2018 12:55 pm

Flyingcloud wrote:
Thu Mar 01, 2018 12:23 pm
:headscratch: "1 Garlic Clove, unpeeled and quartered"

I don't understand, don't peel it, quarter it.

A Garlic Clove looks like this:

Image

And if one peels it, and it is a good idea to peel it, the pieces of a garlic clove looks like this:

Image

I could understand directions which said: Peel, then quarter the pieces of one garlic clove.

I trim the little dry shaggy ends off of the pieces as well as peeling the clove.
Ya, that's just for the Shrimp Stock; It's one clove, not the whole Bulb , and you don't need to peel it if you don't want, the Stock will be filtered through a Sieve anyway. IN FACT, just smash it with the flat of a knife...you don't have to quarter it.

In fact even with the Celery, just cut off the end of the celery (about 1-1/2 inches) which you usually throw anyway, and use that for the Stock.

I do that with all my stocks. I cut off the ends of a bunch of Carrots and store them for making stock. Same with the Ends of Onions, and Celery and even Parsley (I'll save the Leaves for prime dishes, and lop off the ends to use in Stocks.
Even when I use Shrimps in various dishes that don't require a fish stock, I make a Stock from The Shrimp Shells anyway and Freeze it in Jars.....I keep all sorts of Jars of Stock in my Garage Freezer .....Chicken, Beef, Veal, Fish, Shrimp, Crab, Lobster, and some Vegetable Stocks of various kinds e.g Leek etc.

For example, I'll take a Shrimp Stock from the Freezer and add it to the Shrimp Shells of a new dish and cook the dish faster. If I'm making a Lobster or Craw-fish Bisque, having some frozen crayfish Stock makes things a lot faster.....in facts some of the time you can't buy it anywhere if you wanted.

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Flyingcloud
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Re: Shrimp Etouffee

Post by Flyingcloud » Thu Mar 01, 2018 1:21 pm

I understand all of that and that all sounds like good cooking practices to me.

But I'm just now realizing you only use just one little bitty tiny piece of a garlic. Not a whole clove or bulb.

;)

I really like recipes which call for 4 or 5 cloves of garlic. I buy those three pound bags of peeled garlic at Costco. I trim off the ends and use a half cup of the pieces for each clove the recipe calls for.

When a recipe doesn't call for garlic but calls for onion, I use the amount of onion it calls for, and add 1/3 by volume garlic as well.

Folks like it when I cook.

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ConsrvYank1
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Re: Shrimp Etouffee

Post by ConsrvYank1 » Thu Mar 01, 2018 4:38 pm

Flyingcloud wrote:
Thu Mar 01, 2018 1:21 pm
I understand all of that and that all sounds like good cooking practices to me.

But I'm just now realizing you only use just one little bitty tiny piece of a garlic. Not a whole clove or bulb.

That tiny piece you refer to is the clove, and all the small cloves are what make the bulb. So yes, you do use a whole clove.

;)

I really like recipes which call for 4 or 5 cloves of garlic. I buy those three pound bags of peeled garlic at Costco. I trim off the ends and use a half cup of the pieces for each clove the recipe calls for.

When a recipe doesn't call for garlic but calls for onion, I use the amount of onion it calls for, and add 1/3 by volume garlic as well.

Folks like it when I cook.

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falvegas
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Re: Shrimp Etouffee

Post by falvegas » Fri Mar 02, 2018 3:04 am

Flyingcloud wrote:
Thu Mar 01, 2018 1:21 pm
I understand all of that and that all sounds like good cooking practices to me.

But I'm just now realizing you only use just one little bitty tiny piece of a garlic. Not a whole clove or bulb.

;)

I really like recipes which call for 4 or 5 cloves of garlic. I buy those three pound bags of peeled garlic at Costco. I trim off the ends and use a half cup of the pieces for each clove the recipe calls for.

When a recipe doesn't call for garlic but calls for onion, I use the amount of onion it calls for, and add 1/3 by volume garlic as well.

Folks like it when I cook.
Ah yes, a true Garlic Lover.

Somewhere I have some Recipes for Chicken with 40 to 50 Garlic Cloves , and Garlic Soups with 40 to 50 Cloves. Might be in one of Paul Bocuse's books. I cook quite a bit from his books, the father of Country French cooking. About 1/3rd of the time I'll cook Louisiana Cuisine, and it's moderately Garlic intensive. But the other third of the time I cook it's SOUTHWEST CUISINE, which is regional, where I live, and it's not that Garlic intensive.

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harry12
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Re: Shrimp Etouffee

Post by harry12 » Mon Mar 12, 2018 9:47 pm

falvegas wrote:
Fri Mar 02, 2018 3:04 am
Flyingcloud wrote:
Thu Mar 01, 2018 1:21 pm
I understand all of that and that all sounds like good cooking practices to me.

But I'm just now realizing you only use just one little bitty tiny piece of a garlic. Not a whole clove or bulb.

;)

I really like recipes which call for 4 or 5 cloves of garlic. I buy those three pound bags of peeled garlic at Costco. I trim off the ends and use a half cup of the pieces for each clove the recipe calls for.

When a recipe doesn't call for garlic but calls for onion, I use the amount of onion it calls for, and add 1/3 by volume garlic as well.

Folks like it when I cook.
Ah yes, a true Garlic Lover.

Somewhere I have some Recipes for Chicken with 40 to 50 Garlic Cloves , and Garlic Soups with 40 to 50 Cloves. Might be in one of Paul Bocuse's books. I cook quite a bit from his books, the father of Country French cooking. About 1/3rd of the time I'll cook Louisiana Cuisine, and it's moderately Garlic intensive. But the other third of the time I cook it's SOUTHWEST CUISINE, which is regional, where I live, and it's not that Garlic intensive.
Emeril had the Roasted Garlic Chicken on his show, As I remember it was a a whole chicken cut up, 50 cloves of garkic, salt pepper and olive oil.

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Flyingcloud
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Re: Shrimp Etouffee

Post by Flyingcloud » Tue Mar 13, 2018 12:36 pm

I like to pre saute garlic (and onions) lightly in a bit of oil so it takes the edge off of it before adding it to the rest of the ingredients for most dishes I cook. When I do that a 1/2 cup, or even 2 cups of garlic, will be mellowed and add to the vegetable mass in a way which is pleasing, not terribly strong.

There are a few recipes I don't alter or make substitutions to. Robert Preston's Scampi is one of those. Too much raw garlic ruins this one, as it probably would ruin the Shrimp Etouffee recipe Falvegas posted. Despite my teasing him about massive amounts of garlic I would prepare his Etouffee recipe as it is written the first time, and I probably will try it.

Another thing which will ruin Robert Preston's Scampi is using that awful "cooking sherry," only use the kind of sherry you would drink from a glass.

ROBERT PRESTON'S SCAMPI

1/2 cup butter
1 garlic clove, crushed
2 teaspoons Worcestershire sauce
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1/4 cup dry sherry
2 tablespoons chopped dillweed

1 pound medium shrimp, shelled and deveined

1/4 cup minced parsley
2 cups hot cooked rice
Grated Parmesan cheese

In shallow pan melt butter over low heat. Add next 5 ingredients; mix well. Arrange shrimp in a single layer in the sauce. Spoon sauce over shrimp. Broil at low heat 8 minutes. Remove from broiler. Let stand for 15 minutes. Sprinkle on parsley. Broil at high heat for 3 more minutes. Spoon sauce over rite. Sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. Arrange shrimp over rice. Yield: 2 portions.

I think this recipe yields 4 portions not 2. If one doubles the amount of the rice bed the scampi is served on It can even yield 6 portions.

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falvegas
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Re: Shrimp Etouffee

Post by falvegas » Tue Mar 13, 2018 1:44 pm

Went to College near Little Italy (the North End) in Boston, and of course we went to school with many of the Italian Kids from there, and yes, including kids of the Mafioso, and a lot of kids from South Boston (Little Ireland). Italian fare was maybe 1/4th of our diet in Boston, and we Frequented the unbelievably great Italian Restaurants in the North End.

When they served Scampi it was as a 'Side' without Pasta, or as a Main Dish with Fettuccine or Capellini....Never with Rice. Sometimes with Lemon, sometimes without depending on the Chef or as a menu Option.

Typical Fare Was; A little Vermouth & Shrimp Stock Reduction (from the Shells) was added to the skillet with the Butter/EVOil & Garlic....a slight dusting of Fresh Oregano OR Basil depending on the Chef. It was served on-the-side Without Pasta & a sprinkle of Parsley & Scallions (a lot of Liquid), OR Served With Pasta and a dusting of Parsley as a Main Dish.

The use of Worcestershire and Dill Weed was never discussed by their cooks, but it sounds interesting. So many of the recipes are Regional.

Kermit
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Re: Shrimp Etouffee

Post by Kermit » Fri Mar 23, 2018 5:45 pm

My wife can eat at an Italian restaurant and I know it as soon as she walks in the house, and for a day or two later.
Me, I can eat garlic by volumes and no one knows.

Years ago I read where nibbling on parsley will eliminate the smell. It's not the mouth that smells, it's the lungs that are discharging the effects. Parsley entering your system somehow naturalizes this. From the article, slowly ingesting parsley is how it works, not just eating it.
But with the wife, it seems to come from her skin.

On a side note, she used to tell me she always knew when I drank Moosehead Beer. Said it seems to emit a certain smell from me.

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falvegas
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Re: Shrimp Etouffee

Post by falvegas » Sat Mar 24, 2018 4:41 pm

Kermit wrote:
Fri Mar 23, 2018 5:45 pm
My wife can eat at an Italian restaurant and I know it as soon as she walks in the house, and for a day or two later.
Me, I can eat garlic by volumes and no one knows.

Years ago I read where nibbling on parsley will eliminate the smell. It's not the mouth that smells, it's the lungs that are discharging the effects. Parsley entering your system somehow naturalizes this. From the article, slowly ingesting parsley is how it works, not just eating it.
But with the wife, it seems to come from her skin.

On a side note, she used to tell me she always knew when I drank Moosehead Beer. Said it seems to emit a certain smell from me.
The only time I had a problem with Garlic, when others could smell it on me, was when I figured out that {Powdered Garlic] had been used.
I almost never, use powdered Garlic for that reason.

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