Lavender

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falvegas
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Lavender

Post by falvegas » Sun Jul 18, 2010 10:29 am

Lavender is one of my favorite’s using Fresh, Dry Lavender Flowers sometimes a Lavender Syrup in drinks, fruits and other deserts including pound cakes and cookies.
I use Herbs de Provence (one of my most important Lavender mixes) in a lot of my Beef, Poultry, Game and Fish recipes, especially Stews and Pot Roasts. Sometimes in BBQ.

I grow Lavender on my deck with other herbs, and have included the other herbs required to make my own Herbs de Provence (the genuine stuff tens to be expensive). But the Lavender (especially the French and Spanish) versions are not easy to grow…likely it’s because of my region.

Anyway. If others happen to run across or have any good recipes using Lavender, drop a post. This isn’t a special request but if you know of something special, I’d like to hear about it.

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Re: Lavender

Post by falvegas » Sun Jul 18, 2010 11:07 am

iamlookingup wrote:Lavender is a big part of my life. I've never used it in my cooking, but I use it everywhere else I can, especially
in my laundry. I LOVE its scent.

What is the best climate in which to grow lavender? :hmm:
Probably as close to the wine country in France as one can get.

I'm in the process of researching Seeds for Lavender because the general purpose Lavender seeds I've bought I had a lot of trouble with...low germination %, seedlings dying off, cratering in intense sun...in short I have to baby them to death....very much unlike my other Herbs.

They all made clear that Lavender needs a Sandy Soil with high acid (that's not hard to achieve), Full Daylong Sun (easy for me), and very little watering. NOT! I grow so many herbs but Lavender was frustrating...still is.

I grow almost all my herbs from seed. But the 1st Lavender I bought was an alarmingly beautiful 18 inch, French Lavender Plant from the Nursery. Both were dead in 3 days. So now I use seed but as I mentioned, they need a lot of care.

didn't mean to ramble on.

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Pixie
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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 2:09 pm

Well, I know nothing about lavender. I have never grown it nor do I know anyone, other than you FALVegas, that has grown lavender... so, I am useless. But, I will try to pull some information for you! I know you well enough to know you have researched this very thoroughly, but, maybe I will post something that will help.

:noparty:

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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 2:17 pm

How to Grow Lavender
I really like the smell of lavender and this may be partially explained by the usually reliable source that says there are two smells that elicit the greatest sexual response from the average male.

The first is the smell of freshly baked chocolate doughnuts and the second, the herbal fragrance of lavender.

Important Points
Height: 8-24 inches depending on variety
Width: Approximately the height
Sun needed: Full hot sun
Soils: Survives on sandy or decent soil - clay soils hold too much water over the winter. Well drained soils
Hardiness: USDA zone 4 (L. angustifolia) to USDA 5 (hybrids- some) to USDA 7 (French)
Propagation: Seeds or cuttings


Origin of Lavender
The word lavender indicates its historical use in cosmetics and toiletry because the Latin word ‘lavo’ means to wash. The ancient Greeks and Romans were heavy users of Lavender so the sweet fragrance and appeal of this plant is obviously not a recent discovery.

And as there is no secret to the name of the plant, there are no secrets to the successful culture of this perennial herb.


How to Grow
Full hot sun is the first ingredient in the recipe and this is a plant that thrives in the hottest part of my garden.

Excellent drainage is another ingredient in the recipe because any excessive wetness around the roots will lead to root rot. It is for this reason that growing lavenders on clay is not recommended. If you have clay soils, grow this plant in a container or in a raised bed with sandy soils in the raised bed.

Planting
The plants should be spaced on 18 inch centres to give them expansion room.

The recipe is complete with a shovel of compost spread around the plant in early spring and yearly spring pruning to remove all the winter-killed branches.

Spring pruning encourages thicker growth and more flower production so do trim the plant in the early spring just when the buds start to swell on the stems.

Feeding
Over feeding leads to soft growth and poor fragrance; you have to be tough on this plant and serious growers will eliminate even the single shovel of compost

Propagation
While lavender is relatively easy to start from seed, named varieties do not come true from seed so the better varieties are always propagated from tender cuttings.

And propagate them we do because this is one of the longest blooming plants in the garden; if deadheaded, Lavender will continue to produce flowers in a range of blues, violets, pinks and whites from mid summer right up until a hard frost.

How Long a Plant Lives
And speaking of frost, commercial growers find that a plant lasts approximately 5 years before it starts to “run out” and decline in health. They take cuttings and propagate the plant so that there are always new ones coming along to replace those that die.

Some garden experts say that you can expect a garden plant to last up to 10 years before it starts to die. Mine have tended towards the five or six year mark but that is hard to say whether it is winter doing the killing or simply the plant getting weaker, or even a combination of the two factors.

Hybrid Lavender
Lavender Families
While there are essentially two lavender families grown in most gardens, (French and English) the tender French forms are not hardy for me (they need a zone 6 or 7) and I have been disappointed every time I tried to overwinter them outdoors. Although plants such as 'Goodwin Creek Grey' are wonderfully fragrant.

The English lavenders on the other hand have returned my enthusiasm by growing and self-sowing in the garden without a care for winter cold.

A hybrid form known as Lavender x intermedia or Lavendin is marginally hardy here and I tend to either heavily mulch it or grow it in containers for wintering in a cold frame.

Plants to Grow
L. angustifolia is the classic English lavender plant and there are some wonderfully hardy and heavy blooming plants on the market.

Look for ‘Blue Cushion’, at 12 to 18 inches tall, its deep blue-violet flowers are held above a compact mounding plant, ‘Jean Davis’is 18 inches tall with pale pink flowers and marginally hardy in my garden.

‘Lavender Lady’ is a mid-lavender blue and blooms first year from seed.

‘Lavender Lady’ is one of the few lavenders that will come true from seed. ‘Loddon Blue’ is a more compact grower than ‘Hidcote’ at 18 inches tall but the flower color and form is a comparable deep violet.

This brings me to the observation that both ‘Hidcote’ and ‘Munstead’ are now seed generated in the nursery trade and as they don’t breed true, the plants you’ll likely obtain from your local nursery only superficially resemble the original plant.

The Lavender x intermedia plants are hybrids between L. angustifolia and L. latifolia and while all are tender, they are wonderful plants. Their tenderness has not stopped me from growing them by any means possible.

‘Grosso’ has deep violet blooms on a thickly branched plant. It is one of the most fragrant and is the main variety used in commercial production in both France and the USA.

‘Hidcote Giant’ grows to 24 inches tall with deep rich purple flowers. It has a more open, coarse growth habit and requires regular and heavy pruning to keep it looking attractive. My favourite in this class is ‘Provence’. It grows to 24 inches tall and has dark purple flowers. I fell in love with the fragrance of this variety when I saw and smelled it in France.

‘Twickel Purple’(aka ‘Twinkles’or ‘Twickes’) is also 24 inches tall but it has broad flat leaves flushed purple in winter. It needs heavy pruning after blooming to thicken it up otherwise it can become leggy. It has deep purple flowers and is another of my favourites. It has the distinction of being used most often in cooking and candy making.

I have had miserable luck trying to get the delightfully variegated lavenders to overwinter. Goldburg with its gold and green striped leaves has proven itself to be quite fickle as has 'Walburton Silver Edge' with white and green stripes. Both are x intermedia forms and on the tender side.

And by the way, chocolate doughnuts are a poor second.:-)

Read more: http://www.gardening-tips-perennials.co ... z0u3jDufkc

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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 2:19 pm

This link takes you to the article which has a bunch of comments and questons... maybe you will get some new thoughts there!

http://www.gardening-tips-perennials.com/lavender.html

This is a link to his blog.

http://blog.douggreensgarden.com/

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Pixie
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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 2:53 pm

Growing and Using Lavender
By Brenda Hyde

Lavender is a beautiful and fragrant herb that every gardener should grow. You'll find it hard to limit yourself to just one plant once you start growing this lovely herb. I grow Lavandula angustifolias because it's a sturdy, cold tolerant variety that works perfectly in my limited space. There are dozens of varieties that can be found. Always check the zone hardiness when buying a plant.
I've found lavender to be easy to care for, but it does require a dry sunny spot. It's not happy if it's too wet or humid. The spot I have it in is in full sun, and I rarely water it, unless we are in drought conditions. You also want to make sure to give it space for air circulation, which at first, meant I had to move some plants that ended up being too close. It needs a loose soil-you can add compost if you wish, but make sure it's not "packed" or heavy. I even added a little sand in the herb bed before planting. Plant lavender with other herbs that prefer this type of soil such as sage oregano, thyme, summer savory or rosemary.

Lavender blooms should be harvested when the bottom third of the flower spike is in bloom. Wait until the sun has dried the morning dew, and it's a dry day. You can cut the entire stem, strip the foliage and dry standing up in a vase, bunched together and hung upside down, or on a screen laying flat. One year I even dried them laying loosely in a big wicker basket. Keep them out of direct sun while drying, and again, make sure they are dry and warm, not humid. An attic, closet or shed can work well. When they are dry, rub the flower heads over a bowl to loosen them from the stem. Store these in a glass container in a darkened place to keep them fresh. You'll notice the key to growing, harvesting and storing lavender is dry conditions. Moisture can lead to mold or mildew.

Lavenders need pruning, but the advice is varied. Prune, but not heavily, seems to be the way to go. After blooming you want to prune some of the older stems, but don't go too heavy. I'm very cautious and prune lightly in the spring and fall. I've also transplanted in the spring when I needed to move the plant with good success. Dig as deeply as you can and move it quickly. You can also take cuttings from a lavender plant to propagate. Cut a 3-4 inch piece of the plant that is newer, not woody. Trim the leaves from the bottom half, remove any blooms, and dip lightly in a rooting hormone, then place in a sterile potting mix or sand. Keep moist, but not soggy--just barely moist. It will take several weeks to root. Keep out of the sun-- temperature around 70 degrees-and in a well ventilated area. When the roots have formed, transplant it to a pot and transfer to the garden in the fall before frost. Mulch it for the winter for a little added protection.

I use dried lavender in bath teas. I use it alone and brew a 1/4 of a cup or so in a bowl covered with boiling water for about 20 minutes. I then strain and add to the bath. I also mix with chamomile half and half or mint, or a little of all three using the same method. Below are recipes using fresh lavender. It's best to pick for the recipes later in the morning, right before making.

Make an easy herbal eye pillow for heating or cooling and placing on your eyes by mixing 1/2 cup flax seed and 1/2 cup lavender and placing in a simple sewn muslin square.

A lovely accent for a luncheon table can be made with lavender braids. Simply braid six lavender branches with the blossoms into a braid. Hold two braids together and loop each one the opposite direction to form two loops. Tie with a raffia or silk bow to hold in place. These can be given as favors, placed at each place setting or used as a package accent instead of a bow. Recipes With Lavender

I personally like to grind the lavender after it has dried before using it recipes, but many people use the buds as is.

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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 2:55 pm

Lavender Cookies

Ingredients:
2 sticks butter or margarine, room temperature
1 cup granulated sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
2 eggs, well beaten
2 tsp. pure vanilla extract
1 tsp. dried lavender buds
2-1/2 cups all-purpose flour

Directions:
Cream the butter, sugar, and salt until light. Add the beaten eggs and vanilla. Mix well.

Add in the flour using low speed just until the dough is starting to form. Sprinkle in the lavender fold in gently.

Divide the dough into two rounded sections. Wrap well in plastic wrap and chill for at least one hour.

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Placed one of the chilled dough sections on a floured surface. Roll out the dough with a floured rolling pin, taking care not to overwork it.

Cut the dough into desired shapes and place them 1/2 inch apart on a ungreased cookie sheet. Bake for 6-8 minutes until just golden brown.

Cool on rack.

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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 2:58 pm

Lavender Tea Cake

Ingredients:
1 cup granulated sugar
5 tablespoons butter, softened
1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 large egg
1 large egg white
1 3/4 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking powder
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1/4 teaspoon salt
1 cup plain fat-free or lowfat yogurt
2 tablespoons finely chopped fresh lavender leaves

Glaze:
1/3 cup sifted powdered sugar
1 teaspoon water
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract

Directions:
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Beat granulated sugar, butter, and vanilla at medium speed until well-blended.

Add egg and egg white, one at a time, beat well after each addition.

Sift flour and carefully measure. Combine the flour with the baking powder, baking soda, and salt, stir well. (I often sift again) Add flour the mixture to sugar mixture alternately with yogurt, beginning and ending with flour mixture.

Stir in lavender. Pour the batter into an 8-inch loaf pan coated with cooking spray. Bake at 350 degrees for about 1 hour or until a wooden pick inserted in the center comes out clean.

To prepare glaze, combine powdered sugar and remaining ingredients. Spread on the warm cake. Cool in pan 20 minutes on a wire rack before removing from the pan. To serve slice thinly and present on a pretty platter.

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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:01 pm

Lavender and Honey Dressing

Ingredients:
6 tbsp. olive oil
2 tbsp. balsamic vinegar
1 tbsp. fresh lemon juice
1 garlic clove, crushed
1 tsp. hearty mustard
2 tbsp. honey
1 tsp. dried lavender buds

Directions:
Whisk together all ingredients. Allow to stand for 30 minutes. Mix again before serving.

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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:05 pm

Lavender Herb Bread

Ingredients:
1 package active dry yeast
1/4 cup warm water
1 cup lowfat cottage cheese
1/4 cup honey
2 tbsp. butter or stick margarine
1 tsp. dried lavender buds
1 tsp. fresh lemon thyme, minced
1/2 tbsp. fresh basil, minced
1/4 tsp. baking soda
2 eggs
2 1/2 cups flour

Directions:
In a small bowl, dissolve yeast in the warm water.

In a larger bowl, mix together the cottage cheese, honey, butter, herbs, baking soda and eggs. Stir in the yeast mixture.

Gradually add flour to form a stiff dough, beating well after each addition. Cover and let rise about 1 hour, or until doubled in bulk.

Stir the dough down with a large wooden spoon. Place in a well greased 1 1/2 or 2 qt. casserole. Allow to rise 30 to 40 minutes, or until doubled in bulk.

Bake at 350 F. for one hour. When finished, remove and turn onto a cooling rack,. Brush top with butter while warm.

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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:06 pm

Well, I decided that nothing I posted for you was that great so I decided to post some recipes... maybe you will find one you'd like to try! I posted a couple of bread recipes as I know what an avid bread baker you are!

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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:35 pm

Peppered Lavender Beef

Ingredients:
1 (3- to 4-pound) beef tenderloin roast
1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
1 tablespoons whole black peppercorns
1 tablespoons whole white peppercorns
2 tablespoons fennel seeds
1 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
2 tablespoons dried culinary lavender flowers

Directions:
Trimming the tenderloin roast:
Bring the tenderloin roast to room temperature before cooking.

Trim the tenderloin of fat and silverskin.

Note: Silverskin is a silvery-white connective tissue. It doesn't dissolve when the tenderloin is cooked, so it needs to be trimmed away. If the silverskin is not trimmed off, it will cause the tenderloin to curl up into the shape of a quarter moon. If you ask, your butcher will do this for you.

Trussing the tenderloin:
Once the tenderloin roast is trimmed, it no longer has any structure and will start to flatten out. As you want the meat as round as possible for even cooking and also for presentation, trussing is the key.

Using individual pieces of kitchen twine/string to truss the roast. Tie the kitchen string around the tenderloin roast with equal spacing between each truss. Tie the meat firmly, but not too tight. NOTE: I usually have my butcher do this for me.

Pat the beef dry with paper towels (this is important as surface moisture will interfere with good browning). Lightly oil outside of the roast.

In a small spice or coffee grinder, coarsely grind the black peppercorns, white peppercorns, fennel seeds, thyme, and lavender flowers; rub mixture all over the meat. Wrap tightly in plastic wrap and refrigerate at least 2 hours or overnight (preferably).

Searing the tenderloin:
By browning the meat's proteins and sugars, you are enhancing the meat's flavor even more. NOTE: The tenderloin roast that I cooked was approximately 5 pounds and wouldn't fit in my fry pan. I used my large cast-iron griddle to sear it. It worked great!

Heat a large cast-iron frying pan over high heat. Without adding any cooking fat, sear the roast on all sides (about 3 rotations, approximately 1 minutes each). NOTE: Resist the temptation to constantly turn the beef from side to side and you'll be rewarded with a beautifully browned crust. When browned, immediately remove from heat.

Roasting the tenderloin:
Preheat oven to 450°F.

Tenderloin, like other lean cuts of meat, are best roasted at a high heat rather than baked at lower temperatures. Flavor comes from the browning, not from fat slowly melting into the meat.

Place the seared roast in a large baking pan or roasting pan and bake, uncovered. Roast in oven approximately 20 to 40 minutes (depending on size of your roast) until a meat thermometer registers desired temperature (see below). NOTE: Turn tenderloin over halfway through cooking for even browning.

Rare - 120°F
Medium Rare - 125°F
Medium - 130°F

What constitutes rare and medium-rare cooked meat? To satisfy government home economists, the Beef Council says rare beef means an internal temperature of 140 degrees F. Well, that is ok if you like well-done and dry meat. If you like moist, rosy meat (like I do), rare begins at 120 degrees and starts to become medium rare at 125 or 130 degrees. To cook your meat properly, you must purchase and use a good instant-read digital meat thermometer.

I, personally, use the Thermapen 5 Thermometer. Originally designed for professional users, the Super-Fast Thermapen is used by chefs all over the world. The pocket design replaces more costly and bulky handheld thermometers while using the same professional thermocouple technology.

When the tenderloin roast is cooked to your liking, remove from oven, and transfer onto a cutting board; cover with a tent of aluminum foil and let stand 15 minutes before carving (meat temperature will rise 5 to 10 degrees after it is removed from the oven).

When ready to serve: Cut the roast into 1/2-inch slices. Transfer onto a serving platter and serve immediately with any accumulated juices.

Makes 6 to 8 servings.

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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:42 pm

Wow, this sounds good!
+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Strawberry-Lavender Spritzer
By Joe Coca
Serves 4 to 6

Even if you can’t get to a lavender festival this summer, tip a glass of this light summer cocktail in salute to glorious fields of home-grown purple pleasure.

• 1/4 cup orange juice
• 1 cup fresh strawberries
• 1 tablespoon fresh lavender buds
• 3 cups white wine (or one 750 ml bottle)
• 4 cups mineral water
• 4 to 6 fresh lavender sprigs
• 4 to 6 fresh strawberries

1. In a blender or food processor, blend the orange juice, 1 cup of strawberries, and lavender flowers. Transfer to a jug or bowl.

2. Pour wine over the blended mixture and allow to steep for 30 minutes; then strain into a punch bowl, discarding solids.

3. To serve, fill a wineglass half full with this flavored wine and top with mineral water. Garnish with a sprig of lavender and a strawberry.

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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 3:49 pm

Lavender Aioli
By Joe Coca

Serves 6 to 8

To use as a delicate sauce for summer vegetables, thin with 1 to 2 additional tablespoons lemon juice.

INGREDIENTS
• 1 cup olive oil
• 6 cloves garlic, unpeeled and crushed
• 2 fresh lavender sprigs (leaves and flowers) bruised
• 3 eggs
• 1 tablespoon lemon juice

DIRECTIONS
1. In a small saucepan, gently heat the oil with the garlic and lavender over low heat for about 15 minutes.

2. Remove from heat just before oil starts to bubble. Allow to cool to room temperature.

3. With a sieve over a small bowl, strain the lavender oil, pressing with a spoon to extract soft solids from the garlic and lavender. Discard herbs.

4. In a food processor or blender, process the eggs and lemon juice until well blended. With the motor running, add the lavender oil a few drops at a time, then in a thin, steady stream until all the oil is absorbed and the mixture has thickened.

5. Season to taste with salt and black pepper.

6. Refrigerate for up to 2 days or use immediately. Aioli thickens on chilling.

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falvegas
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Re: Lavender

Post by falvegas » Sun Jul 18, 2010 4:32 pm

Pixie wrote:Growing and Using Lavender
By Brenda Hyde

Lavender is a beautiful and fragrant herb that every gardener should grow. You'll find it hard to limit yourself to just one plant once you start growing this lovely herb. I grow Lavandula angustifolias because it's a sturdy, cold tolerant variety that works perfectly in my limited space. There are dozens of varieties that can be found. Always check the zone hardiness when buying a plant.
I've found lavender to be easy to care for, but it does require a dry sunny spot. It's not happy if it's too wet or humid. The spot I have it in is in full sun, and I rarely water it, unless we are in drought conditions. You also want to make sure to give it space for air circulation, which at first, meant I had to move some plants that ended up being too close. It needs a loose soil-you can add compost if you wish, but make sure it's not "packed" or heavy. I even added a little sand in the herb bed before planting. Plant lavender with other herbs that prefer this type of soil such as sage oregano, thyme, summer savory or rosemary.

Lavender blooms should be harvested when the bottom third of the flower spike is in bloom. Wait until the sun has dried the morning dew, and it's a dry day. You can cut the entire stem, strip the foliage and dry standing up in a vase, bunched together and hung upside down, or on a screen laying flat. One year I even dried them laying loosely in a big wicker basket. Keep them out of direct sun while drying, and again, make sure they are dry and warm, not humid. An attic, closet or shed can work well. When they are dry, rub the flower heads over a bowl to loosen them from the stem. Store these in a glass container in a darkened place to keep them fresh. You'll notice the key to growing, harvesting and storing lavender is dry conditions. Moisture can lead to mold or mildew.

Lavenders need pruning, but the advice is varied. Prune, but not heavily, seems to be the way to go. After blooming you want to prune some of the older stems, but don't go too heavy. I'm very cautious and prune lightly in the spring and fall. I've also transplanted in the spring when I needed to move the plant with good success. Dig as deeply as you can and move it quickly. You can also take cuttings from a lavender plant to propagate. Cut a 3-4 inch piece of the plant that is newer, not woody. Trim the leaves from the bottom half, remove any blooms, and dip lightly in a rooting hormone, then place in a sterile potting mix or sand. Keep moist, but not soggy--just barely moist. It will take several weeks to root. Keep out of the sun-- temperature around 70 degrees-and in a well ventilated area. When the roots have formed, transplant it to a pot and transfer to the garden in the fall before frost. Mulch it for the winter for a little added protection.

I use dried lavender in bath teas. I use it alone and brew a 1/4 of a cup or so in a bowl covered with boiling water for about 20 minutes. I then strain and add to the bath. I also mix with chamomile half and half or mint, or a little of all three using the same method. Below are recipes using fresh lavender. It's best to pick for the recipes later in the morning, right before making.

Make an easy herbal eye pillow for heating or cooling and placing on your eyes by mixing 1/2 cup flax seed and 1/2 cup lavender and placing in a simple sewn muslin square.

A lovely accent for a luncheon table can be made with lavender braids. Simply braid six lavender branches with the blossoms into a braid. Hold two braids together and loop each one the opposite direction to form two loops. Tie with a raffia or silk bow to hold in place. These can be given as favors, placed at each place setting or used as a package accent instead of a bow. Recipes With Lavender

I personally like to grind the lavender after it has dried before using it recipes, but many people use the buds as is.
As you must remember, Dry and Sunny is perfect for me. However, with those conditions, one rarely gets 'Dew'. :lolh:

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falvegas
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Re: Lavender

Post by falvegas » Sun Jul 18, 2010 4:44 pm

Wow, where'd you get all this stuff so quick...I'm overwhelmed, thank You, Thank You, and Thank You.

I just love the Aioli, and Peppered Beef, and Tea Cake w/Yogurt...don't have many of those except with Herbes Provence. Never would have thought of it.

I do have recipes for Lemon & Pound Cakes, Sauces & Spreads with honey, Breads, Fruit Cobblers, Cookies and Shortbreads, and a host of drinks with champagne. BUT make no mistake, these are excellent, and very, very welcome additions, as rarely are two the same, and knowing you, these will augment with 'Improvement' what I have.

AND my Lavender folder is far too small.

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Pixie
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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Sun Jul 18, 2010 5:57 pm

Those are my favorites too, the Peppered Beef and the Aioli! My other favorite is the Strawberry-Lavendar Spritzer! That sounds yummy!

Each recipe I posted sounds good but I thought I posted two bread recipes for you but I only see one???? :hmm:

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falvegas
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Re: Lavender

Post by falvegas » Sun Jul 18, 2010 7:17 pm

Pixie wrote:Those are my favorites too, the Peppered Beef and the Aioli! My other favorite is the Strawberry-Lavendar Spritzer! That sounds yummy!

Each recipe I posted sounds good but I thought I posted two bread recipes for you but I only see one???? :hmm:
From memory I sort of remember my; Lavender in Champagne and a few other drinks, Fruit Cobblers like Peach & Lavender, lemon/Lavender Shortbread, and one of my favorites is fresh fruits (e.g. Apricots) with Figs, pan-Seared and served with Lavender, Mint & Honey. And there is a Lavender Honey out there but I haven't found any...been away awhile.

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Re: Lavender

Post by Justine » Sun Jul 18, 2010 8:02 pm

A beautiful and bountiful lavendar plant grows in my office, thanks to a friend who gave it to me, a while after I baked her a delicious lavendar birthday cake. (I no longer have the recipe; it was on the back of the Wilton rose pan). Lavendar is one wonderful! Thanks for the recipes!

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Re: Lavender

Post by Charybdis » Sun Jul 18, 2010 10:04 pm

iamlookingup wrote:Lavender is a big part of my life. I've never used it in my cooking, but I use it everywhere else I can, especially
in my laundry. I LOVE its scent.

What is the best climate in which to grow lavender? :hmm:
Sequim, WA. (pronounced "Squim")

It's the lavender capital of N. America, and is about 40 minutes from us. The town is nestled in the rain shadow of the Olympic mountains, and usually provides a welcome retreat from the NW rains. Yet it doesn't give up the rich soil that the region is noted for.

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falvegas
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Re: Lavender

Post by falvegas » Mon Jul 19, 2010 2:48 am

Walnut Lavender Bread
Ingredients
1 1/2 cups water, at room temperature
I package active dry yeast (not rapid rise)
3 cups unbleached bread flour
1 1/2 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon coarsely chopped fresh lavender buds or 3/4 tablespoon dried
2 teaspoons salt
1 cup walnut halves or pieces (3 ounces)
Directions
* Pour the water into a food processor and sprinkle the yeast on top. Add the flour, honey, lavender and salt and process for 1 minute. Add the walnuts and pulse just until they''re evenly incorporated into the dough. Scrape the side and bottom of the bowl as needed with a rubber spatula. The dough should be very soft and sticky. Transfer the dough to a bowl, cover and let rise in the refrigerator for at least 12 and up to 24 hours.
* On a lightly floured work surface, pat the dough into a 10-inch square. Fold it in half, pat it out a little, then fold it in half again so that you end up with a 6inch square. Cut the dough in half.
* Stretch out each piece of dough to a 9-by-4-inch oval. It will look like the sole of a very big shoe. Transfer the loaves to a lightly floured baking sheet. Cover with a dish towel and let rise at room temperature until doubled in bulk, 1 1/2 to 2 hours.
* Preheat the oven to 375°. Bake the loaves on the middle shelf for 30 to 35 minutes, or until browned. Cool completely on a rack before slicing.

LAVENDER POUND CAKE
Ingredients
1 1/2 cups sugar
1 cup unsalted butter, room temperature
6 large egg yolks
3 1/2 cups cake flour
1 cup milk
2 teaspoons baking powder
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
2 tablespoons finely chopped lavender flowers
Directions:
Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.
Butter and lightly flour a 13x9x2" baking pan.
In a mixer, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy.
Beat in egg yolks one at a time.
On low speed, add cake flour alternately with milk.
Beat in baking powder and vanilla.
Beat in lavender flowers.
Pour into prepared pan and bake for 50 minutes at 350 degrees, until cake tester inserted in center comes out clean.
Cool in pan for 15 minutes, then turn out on to a pretty platter and cool completely.

Lavender Marinated Leg of Lamb
Ingredients
One 5 1/2-pound butterflied leg of lamb, trimmed
4 anchovy fillets, cut crosswise into 24 pieces
2 garlic cloves, each cut into 6 slices and halved lengthwise
2 teaspoons minced rosemary
1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for serving
1/4 cup dry white wine
1 tablespoon dried lavender (see Note)
Salt and freshly ground pepper
Lemon wedges, for serving
Directions
Using a small, sharp knife, make 24 incisions all over the lamb. Stuff each incision with a piece of anchovy and garlic and a pinch of the rosemary. In a roasting pan, combine the 1/4 cup of olive oil with the wine and lavender. Add the lamb and coat well. Cover and refrigerate overnight.
Light a grill. Bring the lamb to room temperature and season with salt and pepper. Grill the lamb over a moderately low fire for about 40 minutes, or until lightly charred and an instant-read thermometer inserted in the thickest part registers 125° for medium rare. Transfer the lamb to a carving board, cover with foil and let rest for 10 minutes before thinly slicing it. Serve with lemon wedges and additional olive oil.

Lemon Lavender Shortbreads
1/3 cup sugar
1 teaspoon dried lavender blossoms, chopped
1 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
1 stick (4 ounces) unsalted butter, softened
1 cup all-purpose flour
1/2 teaspoon salt
Directions
In a medium bowl, mix the sugar with the chopped lavender and grated lemon zest. Using a handheld electric mixer, beat in the butter at moderate speed. At low speed, beat in the flour and salt until a soft dough forms. Transfer the dough to a sheet of wax paper and refrigerate for 20 minutes. Form the dough into a 4-inch log and chill for at least 45 minutes longer.
Preheat the oven to 350°. Slice the shortbread dough into 1/4-inch-thick rounds and place the rounds on ungreased baking sheets. Freeze the rounds for 10 minutes.
Bake the shortbread for 20 to 25 minutes, or until the edges are lightly browned. Transfer the baked shortbread to a wire rack to cool completely.

Lavender Honey (this is pretty good on Pork Chops and pan grilled Peaches which also can be served with Pork Chops)
1/2 cup honey
1 tablespoon dried lavender buds
3 whole cloves
2 tablespoons sherry vinegar
In a small saucepan, combine the honey with the lavender and the whole cloves and cook over moderate heat, undisturbed, for 6 minutes. Remove the honey from the heat and stir in 2 tablespoons of the sherry vinegar. Let the honey cool for 10 minutes, then strain the lavender-infused honey through a fine sieve into a small heatproof bowl.

Tincture of Lavender (use in a variety of Vodka drinks)
Add 1 tsp Dry Lavender to 4 Oz Vodka in a covered Jar and let sit at room temperature for about a week.

Fresh Lavender Sprigs can be used in Coolers and Champaign (Sprigs should have the flowers on them)

Lavender Syrup (use in chilled Cocktails using Fresh Fruit Juices and Club Soda)
6 ounces hot Simple Syrup
1/2 teaspoon dried Lavender Buds
In a heatproof bowl, combine Hot Simple Syrup and Lavender Buds. Let stand for 25 minutes, then strain into an airtight container and let cool completely.

Vinaigrettes; Add fresh Lavender Leaves and Flowers to your favorite Vinaigrette

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Pixie
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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Mon Jul 19, 2010 8:46 am

Well, of course, I go right for the desserts! :lolh: :embarrassed: The Lavender Lemon Shortbreads sound scrumptious! I will have to give that a try!

Also, I would imagine that the recipe with th leg of lamb is very good too!

I have noticed with the pound cake recipes some call for cake flour others call for A/P. I am going to have to do a taste test.

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falvegas
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Re: Lavender

Post by falvegas » Mon Jul 19, 2010 9:21 am

Pixie wrote:Well, of course, I go right for the desserts! :lolh: :embarrassed: The Lavender Lemon Shortbreads sound scrumptious! I will have to give that a try!

Also, I would imagine that the recipe with th leg of lamb is very good too!

I have noticed with the pound cake recipes some call for cake flour others call for A/P. I am going to have to do a taste test.
Well now you're out of my league. But, doesn't Cake Flour keep a cake lighter in texture? Doesn't it have like 1/2 the protein of AP or Bread Flour?

Actually I have used dry lavender buds in a few of these recipes, the pound cake a few times. Most of the time I wing it, I'll crush some dry buds into a dish if it sounds good.

However the true reason I originally decided to grow some lavender was 'Cost'. My primary use of Lavender is in 'Herbes de Provence', I wanted to make my own. It goes back to a time I was out of the herb mix and was going to make my Pot Roast. None of the stores had the herb mix, not even Whole Foods. I finally found some at Williams Sonoma but it was $18 for a small crock. Instead I bought the 'refill' for the crock but it was still $12. It was the genuine French Version (which many aren't) but still expensive. That's really how my Lavender Story began, except I do keep electric fragrance atmomizers at a few places in the house, and they are a Lavender scent.

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Pixie
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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Mon Jul 19, 2010 8:09 pm

Hey, this isn't out of your league at all! That is exactly the answer... I want to see if I can taste that much of a difference. :) I want to see if the average person... the one that usually buys Sara Lee can tell! :)

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falvegas
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Re: Lavender

Post by falvegas » Mon Jul 19, 2010 8:14 pm

Herbes de Provence
I enjoy the addition of Lavender Flowers in this complex herb mix, but the traditional French don’t always use Lavender. It adds an almost exotic flavor to all Meats, Poultry, Fish Salads, Vegetables, and sauces.

The ingredients I use for Herbes de Provence are
4 Tbsp dried thyme
3 Tbsp dried marjoram
3 Tbsp dried summer savory
2 Tbsp dried rosemary
1 Tbsp dried tarragon
1 Tbsp dried basil
1 Tbsp dried fennel seeds
1 tsp dried chervil
1 tsp dried mint
1 tsp dried lavender flowers

The following French Product I purchase from Williams Sonoma is expensive but excellent.
Image

4 parts dried thyme
3 parts dried summer savory
1 part Tbsp dried basil
1 part Tbsp dried fennel seeds
1 part dried lavender flowers

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Pixie
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Re: Lavender

Post by Pixie » Mon Jul 19, 2010 8:22 pm

My dear friend... why don't you package your recipe and sell it?????????? You could start online and I am sure it would grow!!!!!!!!

That crock looks like the one from Williams Sonoma (my favorite store) but something similar would be perfect!!!!!! Or even a tin! That would be very cool!

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