Gas Or Electric

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abbi
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Gas Or Electric

Post by abbi » Tue Jul 13, 2010 5:26 pm

What is your stove preference for cooking, gas or electric? Personally, I would rather cook with gas, even though I have an electric stove right now. :ohwell:

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falvegas
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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by falvegas » Tue Jul 13, 2010 5:44 pm

When I want to turn up or down the amount of heat, I prefer it respond immediately. And I like to see it do just that.

Other considerations are Stove-Top Grilling and Stir Fry. It comes down to Watts/Sq Inch, and although there are exceptions, Gas has always provided the best intense heat source for me.

For what it's worth...GAS.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by ConsrvYank1 » Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:06 pm

I had a chance to get gas, and I still can, but regardless, I prefer electric. I am afraid of gas, so that wouldn't work for me. I don't want to worry about something exploding every time I turn a stove on. The fear may be irrational, but that doesn't stop me from having it. Besides, nobody ever complained about my cooking. I had a gas stove once, and it burned everything, no matter how low I put the flame. I hated it. But it was an apartment, so I had no choice.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by falvegas » Tue Jul 13, 2010 6:27 pm

ConsrvYank1 wrote:I had a chance to get gas, and I still can, but regardless, I prefer electric. I am afraid of gas, so that wouldn't work for me. I don't want to worry about something exploding every time I turn a stove on. The fear may be irrational, but that doesn't stop me from having it. Besides, nobody ever complained about my cooking. I had a gas stove once, and it burned everything, no matter how low I put the flame. I hated it. But it was an apartment, so I had no choice.
One of the topics that would be useful in here is how the quality of one's cookware impacts the quality of the result, and what are the special features of that cookware, and why it makes a difference.

Also what cookware is adversely effected by high heat, abrasive chemicals and utensils, sudden temperature change, etc. Also what cookware has a limited or almost unlimited lifetime (which are really the most cost effective).

For example how does a 3 ply quality pan distruibute heat evenly and minimize burning foods? What actions, methods, and chemicals are ultimately destructive to Teflon cookware...how long will it realistically last? What metalurgy is important to quality cookware (what is the difference between 18/0, 18/5, and 18/10 Stainless?). What are the best uses for Cast Iron, and the performance features of Enameled Cast Iron.

I can assure you that I have frequently burned food in inexpensive or poorly constructed pans whether on gas or electric.

I once built in an Ceramic Top electric stove top by Jennaire, because I had no gas line to the house. It was an excellent stove, and it was very expensive. There was one burner that was high intensity and came up to full heat quickly, however, like most professional Chefs, I certainly prefer GAS.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by tattulip » Tue Jul 13, 2010 7:11 pm

I had gas at my house and didn't like it much. Gas stoves are way harder to clean. My new electric stove burners get hot fast!

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by StarryNightDave » Tue Jul 13, 2010 7:25 pm

I've had both and I love gas. :thumbsup:

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by Pixie » Tue Jul 13, 2010 7:50 pm

I, too, have used both and my answer is definitely gas stoves!

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by Pixie » Tue Jul 13, 2010 7:59 pm

falvegas wrote:
ConsrvYank1 wrote:I had a chance to get gas, and I still can, but regardless, I prefer electric. I am afraid of gas, so that wouldn't work for me. I don't want to worry about something exploding every time I turn a stove on. The fear may be irrational, but that doesn't stop me from having it. Besides, nobody ever complained about my cooking. I had a gas stove once, and it burned everything, no matter how low I put the flame. I hated it. But it was an apartment, so I had no choice.
One of the topics that would be useful in here is how the quality of one's cookware impacts the quality of the result, and what are the special features of that cookware, and why it makes a difference.

Also what cookware is adversely effected by high heat, abrasive chemicals and utensils, sudden temperature change, etc. Also what cookware has a limited or almost unlimited lifetime (which are really the most cost effective).

For example how does a 3 ply quality pan distruibute heat evenly and minimize burning foods? What actions, methods, and chemicals are ultimately destructive to Teflon cookware...how long will it realistically last? What metalurgy is important to quality cookware (what is the difference between 18/0, 18/5, and 18/10 Stainless?). What are the best uses for Cast Iron, and the performance features of Enameled Cast Iron.

I can assure you that I have frequently burned food in inexpensive or poorly constructed pans whether on gas or electric.

I once built in an Ceramic Top electric stove top by Jennaire, because I had no gas line to the house. It was an excellent stove, and it was very expensive. There was one burner that was high intensity and came up to full heat quickly, however, like most professional Chefs, I certainly prefer GAS.
Wow! These are all excellent questions. Um, are you sure you don’t want to start a separate thread for all of this? This is excellent reference material and should be correctly titled for future reference by cooks and potential cooks. :)

Anyway, here goes! For the best results in all, that you cook, you should be willing to make an investment in your cookware! I have very few pieces of cookware because I am a firm believer that my investment must pay off and one way is to ensure your pieces multitask! Therefore, I do not recommend buying sets… buy only the pieces that you will use.

I own All Clad LTD, which is five ply cookware with three 18/10 stainless steel layers around the two aluminum layers sandwiched in-between for conductivity. This gives you excellent weight with virtually no possibility of warping… this gives you a lifetime of excellent cooking with very little care. I own a 10” skillet a 12” skillet, a 4 ½ quart soup pot and an 8 quart stockpot: Also, I own an 8” and a 10” nonstick skillet that I use for eggs/omelets.

Never use abrasive cleaners or pads on your cookware. If you have something that is stuck fill your pot/pan with warm soapy water and put over a burner with medium heat. Allow the water to come to a boil and that will loosen the stuck material and allow you to get it off with a plastic scrubby: Also, while the water is boiling you can use a silicone spatula to work off the offending materials.

Never use high heat when cooking… medium heat is almost always perfect… sometimes, when sautéing, you might need medium high… never higher.

I think I answered everything?????

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by falvegas » Tue Jul 13, 2010 9:22 pm

iamlookingup wrote:I've always had electric.

I love my glass stove...SO easy to clean!
Gas Stoves are easy to clean.

Thje only electric I ever installed was my Ceramic Top, and that was the easiest of all to clean but you needed special cleansers.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by tattulip » Tue Jul 13, 2010 10:04 pm

falvegas wrote:
iamlookingup wrote:I've always had electric.

I love my glass stove...SO easy to clean!
Gas Stoves are easy to clean.

Thje only electric I ever installed was my Ceramic Top, and that was the easiest of all to clean but you needed special cleansers.
My gas stove was horrible to clean! so I didn't. :TTC:

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by falvegas » Tue Jul 13, 2010 10:56 pm

Pixie wrote:
falvegas wrote:
ConsrvYank1 wrote:I had a chance to get gas, and I still can, but regardless, I prefer electric. I am afraid of gas, so that wouldn't work for me. I don't want to worry about something exploding every time I turn a stove on. The fear may be irrational, but that doesn't stop me from having it. Besides, nobody ever complained about my cooking. I had a gas stove once, and it burned everything, no matter how low I put the flame. I hated it. But it was an apartment, so I had no choice.
One of the topics that would be useful in here is how the quality of one's cookware impacts the quality of the result, and what are the special features of that cookware, and why it makes a difference.

Also what cookware is adversely effected by high heat, abrasive chemicals and utensils, sudden temperature change, etc. Also what cookware has a limited or almost unlimited lifetime (which are really the most cost effective).

For example how does a 3 ply quality pan distruibute heat evenly and minimize burning foods? What actions, methods, and chemicals are ultimately destructive to Teflon cookware...how long will it realistically last? What metalurgy is important to quality cookware (what is the difference between 18/0, 18/5, and 18/10 Stainless?). What are the best uses for Cast Iron, and the performance features of Enameled Cast Iron.

I can assure you that I have frequently burned food in inexpensive or poorly constructed pans whether on gas or electric.

I once built in an Ceramic Top electric stove top by Jennaire, because I had no gas line to the house. It was an excellent stove, and it was very expensive. There was one burner that was high intensity and came up to full heat quickly, however, like most professional Chefs, I certainly prefer GAS.
Wow! These are all excellent questions. Um, are you sure you don’t want to start a separate thread for all of this? This is excellent reference material and should be correctly titled for future reference by cooks and potential cooks. :)

Anyway, here goes! For the best results in all, that you cook, you should be willing to make an investment in your cookware! I have very few pieces of cookware because I am a firm believer that my investment must pay off and one way is to ensure your pieces multitask! Therefore, I do not recommend buying sets… buy only the pieces that you will use.

I own All Clad LTD, which is five ply cookware with three 18/10 stainless steel layers around the two aluminum layers sandwiched in-between for conductivity. This gives you excellent weight with virtually no possibility of warping… this gives you a lifetime of excellent cooking with very little care. I own a 10” skillet a 12” skillet, a 4 ½ quart soup pot and an 8 quart stockpot: Also, I own an 8” and a 10” nonstick skillet that I use for eggs/omelets.

Never use abrasive cleaners or pads on your cookware. If you have something that is stuck fill your pot/pan with warm soapy water and put over a burner with medium heat. Allow the water to come to a boil and that will loosen the stuck material and allow you to get it off with a plastic scrubby: Also, while the water is boiling you can use a silicone spatula to work off the offending materials.

Never use high heat when cooking… medium heat is almost always perfect… sometimes, when sautéing, you might need medium high… never higher.

I think I answered everything?????

You did indeed, and you’re so right. All Clad is ‘The’ professional grade, outstanding performance and durability, and as such, very expensive. Made in America the way products should be made, and you’ll pass them on to your children or whomever.

And you’re right, do not (in general) buy cookware Sets.

As with you I find Multi-Ply 18/10 Stainless the best performing for almost all uses.
FYI: the 18/10 is very important. 18 is the amount (%) of Chromium in the Steel. ‘0’, ‘5’. or ‘10’ is the Amount of Nickel in the steel, and that is for hardness. Several of the older 18/05 pans I had I threw out because the scratched too easily.

For Stews and long Braising I find Enameled Coated Cast Iron to be superior. Most especially Le Creuset, Staub, and Chantal. I have 2 of these Dutch Ovens, and they are irreplaceable for that application. The inside of the Domed lids are ‘Dimpled’ so that steam condensates evenly over the cover and drops evenly back onto the Roast. They are however, expensive, especially Le Creuset. I got a Le Creuset ‘Clone’ at Price Club, can’t tell the difference, made by Kirkland, and got it for $50 (got the last one the day they put them out). The Le Creuset’s are about $250.

With Enameled Cast Iron, However, use the same procedures you would use with any enameled product. Do not use metal utensils or even Composite (for Teflon) utensils because they can build up a hard crust on the sharp edge of the utensil and will scratch the enamel over time.

My rule of thumb is; use nothing but Wood Handled Silicone Spatulas on all my cookware;’ Stainless, Enameled, Hard Anodized Aluminum, and Teflon.
Note: When you get a Fond, Crusties you won’t be using, and are stuck at the bottom of a pan…ADD some vinegar then a little water while the pan is still Hot, it’ll loosen right up. Otherwise soak it in mild dish soap and hot water and clean it the next day.

My experience:
STAINLESS: 3 to 5 Multi-Ply (with aluminum or Copper Core), and 18/10 Stainless is always very much worth it, especially from a brand Manufacturer e.g. All Clad, Calphalon etc. You can use metal utensils on stainless but I'd do this only when absolutely necessary, it will scratch over time.
STAINLESS (Teflon Coated); I might recommend this if and only if it’s the new grade hard Teflon, AND it’s not going to be an every-day pan. Avoid any utensils that will scratch even carbon composites.
TIN or CARBON STEEL:…Avoid these except for Large (Occasional Use) stock pots used for Boiling Lobsters, Corn, Clam Bake Boil i.e. boiling for a large crowd or Camping.
ALUMINUM (thin gauge); almost Never consider it, except in a pinch (Maybe consider in a huge Turkey Roaster or something like that).
ALUMINUM (thick Gauge); look for cookware that’s at least 1/8 Inch to 3/16 Inch thick on the Bottom and the Sides, and is ‘HARD ANODIZED’. Companies like ‘Analon’ make excellent quality anodized aluminum pans. The extra thickness distributes the heat evenly to all sides w/o using multiple-ply construction. But still treat your Anodized pans as you would Teflon…except they’ll last 4 to 5 times longer.
ALUMINUM (Teflon Coated); be sure it’s for occasional use, and never, ever use anything abrasive to clean it more than a cotton cloth and mild dish soap. Aluminum expands and contracts far too much compared to Teflon, and high heat can not only warp the pan, but separate the Teflon.

NEVER: place Teflon in the dish washer regardless what the manufacturer tells you. Never use Oven cleaner on Teflon or on Aluminum even at the bottoms of the pan. Never use Brillo or even the abrasive side of those Sponge Cleaning Pads. Once Teflon get’s scratched, it’s days are numbered.

CAST IRON: A well seasoned cast iron skillet and/or Dutch Oven are priceless additions to a kitchen. They heat slowly, unlike Aluminum, and they hold that heat very even. Properly taken care off, they only need to be wiped out to maintain their Seasoned Characteristics. I recommend Avoiding a ‘Ribbed Cast Iron Pan’ often used for grilling in the Stove-Top. They become almost impossible to clean. You can use Metal utensils on Cast Iron.
ENAMELED CAST IRON: Priceless additions to any kitchen. I described these earlier, especially used for Stews and Braising on the Stove-Top or in the Oven. These maintain even temperatures throughout the surface of the pan, and clean up very easy, easier than straight Cast iron. I cannot imagine Soups, Stews and Braised dishes without my Enameled Cast Iron Dutch Ovens. Again, use no hard utensils, because of the Enamel.


Note: Always start cooking on Low Heat, then raise it gradually to what you need. Never heat a pan with nothing in it. Never place a Hot Pan (whether from the Stove-Top or from the Oven) on the Counter (enamel and cast iron can crack, and metal can WARP, especially thin metal pans). Place them on a Trivet or leave on the stove with the heat off i.e. no sudden temperature changes.

Thin pans will warp with high temperature, and if you leave one on the stove 'Dry' you can melt the Aluminum Core, often separating the Core from the Clad around it. The pan is destroyed.
Thin metal pans also do not distribute the Heat evenly throughout the pan, they tend to concentrate it at the Base, and you're far more likely to Burn Food.

Pans with Thick Bottoms and Thin Sides [especially Dutch Ovens, Sauce Pans, and Stock Pots) you'll never get the performance you need, as the heat won't distribute evenly all around the pan.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by Pixie » Wed Jul 14, 2010 8:40 am

FYI: the 18/10 is very important. 18 is the amount (%) of Chromium in the Steel. ‘0’, ‘5’. or ‘10’ is the Amount of Nickel in the steel, and that is for hardness. Several of the older 18/05 pans I had I threw out because the scratched too easily.
I had never heard of 18/05. I was aware of 18/10 and 18/08. I was taught that 18/0 is the same thing as 18/10... is that right?????

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by Pixie » Wed Jul 14, 2010 8:45 am

For Stews and long Braising I find Enameled Coated Cast Iron to be superior. Most especially Le Creuset, Staub, and Chantal. I have 2 of these Dutch Ovens, and they are irreplaceable for that application. The inside of the Domed lids are ‘Dimpled’ so that steam condensates evenly over the cover and drops evenly back onto the Roast. They are however, expensive, especially Le Creuset. I got a Le Creuset ‘Clone’ at Price Club, can’t tell the difference, made by Kirkland, and got it for $50 (got the last one the day they put them out). The Le Creuset’s are about $250.
The price is the reason I have never allowed myself to have one! I have always made due with my 4-1/2 quart All Clad! I have noticed "knockoffs" surfacing and I agree that they are great! I have seen them by Mario Batali, Bobby Flay, Paula Deen and my favorite the one by Lodge... another American company! I have my sights set on a red one at Bed Bath and Beyond! :lolh:

I agree they are a very, very good investment!

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by Pixie » Wed Jul 14, 2010 8:46 am

STAINLESS: 3 to 5 Multi-Ply (with aluminum or Copper Core), and 18/10 Stainless is always very much worth it, especially from a brand Manufacturer e.g. All Clad, Calphalon etc. You can use metal utensils on stainless but I'd do this only when absolutely necessary, it will scratch over time.
Calphalon is an excellent brand! It is my second favorite after All Clad! It is all aluminum, heavy, GREAT conductivity!!!!!! It's an excellent choice!

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by Pixie » Wed Jul 14, 2010 8:52 am

As always, falvegas, invaluable infromation! Brilliantly written!

ImageImage

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by falvegas » Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:30 am

Pixie wrote:
FYI: the 18/10 is very important. 18 is the amount (%) of Chromium in the Steel. ‘0’, ‘5’. or ‘10’ is the Amount of Nickel in the steel, and that is for hardness. Several of the older 18/05 pans I had I threw out because the scratched too easily.
I had never heard of 18/05. I was aware of 18/10 and 18/08. I was taught that 18/0 is the same thing as 18/10... is that right?????
Well, it's not a law, so many of the manufacturers refuse to let you know the metallurgy unless you write to them...if then.

You'll see this on Flatware (stainless) quite a bit. The 18/10 stainless flatware I have looks like the day I bought it. Many of the others, older, look like they came from Fred's junk yard (slight exaggeration of course).

Some will actuaslly be 18/08 and claim (advertise) 18/10.


I believe that if you go to the fabricators web site , the credible manufacturers will be clearly specify the metallurgy. Like Al Clad and Calphalon. Trantamonia is one who only recently has come out with a slightly improved product line, and sometimes indicates the metallurgy. If they won't, don't buy it.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by streetsoldier » Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:31 am

Don't mattah whut kinda stove we got...I stil git gas.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by falvegas » Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:38 am

Pixie wrote:
STAINLESS: 3 to 5 Multi-Ply (with aluminum or Copper Core), and 18/10 Stainless is always very much worth it, especially from a brand Manufacturer e.g. All Clad, Calphalon etc. You can use metal utensils on stainless but I'd do this only when absolutely necessary, it will scratch over time.
Calphalon is an excellent brand! It is my second favorite after All Clad! It is all aluminum, heavy, GREAT conductivity!!!!!! It's an excellent choice!
My Saucier is Calphalon, 18/10 multiply Stainless. If you ever make sauces, you'll need a pan like this or the All Clad Open Saucier. which is nearly perfect but it was almost $60 more than the Calphalon.

I never realized what difference a pan can make when you're making a Béchamel or Hollandaise, any sauce or gravy finishing.

BTW: 18/0 technically has no Nickel in it, and that's your hardness, durability.
Last edited by falvegas on Wed Jul 14, 2010 10:01 am, edited 1 time in total.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by abbi » Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:48 am

falvegas wrote:
Pixie wrote:
STAINLESS: 3 to 5 Multi-Ply (with aluminum or Copper Core), and 18/10 Stainless is always very much worth it, especially from a brand Manufacturer e.g. All Clad, Calphalon etc. You can use metal utensils on stainless but I'd do this only when absolutely necessary, it will scratch over time.
Calphalon is an excellent brand! It is my second favorite after All Clad! It is all aluminum, heavy, GREAT conductivity!!!!!! It's an excellent choice!
My Saucier is Calphalon, 18/10 multiply Stainless. If you ever make sauces, you'll need a pan like this or the All Clad Open Saucier. which is nearly perfect but it was almost $60 more than the Calphalon.

I never realized what difference a pan can make when you're making a Béchamel or Hollandaise, any sauce or gravy finishing.
I have Wolfgang Puck pans, and yes they were a set. They are awesome. They cook excellent.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by falvegas » Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:57 am

Pixie wrote:
For Stews and long Braising I find Enameled Coated Cast Iron to be superior. Most especially Le Creuset, Staub, and Chantal. I have 2 of these Dutch Ovens, and they are irreplaceable for that application. The inside of the Domed lids are ‘Dimpled’ so that steam condensates evenly over the cover and drops evenly back onto the Roast. They are however, expensive, especially Le Creuset. I got a Le Creuset ‘Clone’ at Price Club, can’t tell the difference, made by Kirkland, and got it for $50 (got the last one the day they put them out). The Le Creuset’s are about $250.
The price is the reason I have never allowed myself to have one! I have always made due with my 4-1/2 quart All Clad! I have noticed "knockoffs" surfacing and I agree that they are great! I have seen them by Mario Batali, Bobby Flay, Paula Deen and my favorite the one by Lodge... another American company! I have my sights set on a red one at Bed Bath and Beyond! :lolh:

I agree they are a very, very good investment!

Batali's enameled Cast Iron products are often listed with Le Creuset. I would recommend his products because he's a true pro, not just a notable cook trying to make a fortune by selling [entire cooking pan sets for the price of a single all clad]. As you recommended, stay away from the Notables pan sets like Emeril, Deen, Puck etc. They're money makers. And you'll notice that they almost never mention the metallurgy or true construction characteristics.

The 2 cast enamel dutch ovens I have are, Kirkland (From Costco), and Martha Stewart. They're clones but beautifully constructed, identical to Le Creuset, and they were $50 and $45 respectively.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by tattulip » Wed Jul 14, 2010 10:05 am

abbi wrote:
falvegas wrote:
Pixie wrote:
STAINLESS: 3 to 5 Multi-Ply (with aluminum or Copper Core), and 18/10 Stainless is always very much worth it, especially from a brand Manufacturer e.g. All Clad, Calphalon etc. You can use metal utensils on stainless but I'd do this only when absolutely necessary, it will scratch over time.
Calphalon is an excellent brand! It is my second favorite after All Clad! It is all aluminum, heavy, GREAT conductivity!!!!!! It's an excellent choice!
My Saucier is Calphalon, 18/10 multiply Stainless. If you ever make sauces, you'll need a pan like this or the All Clad Open Saucier. which is nearly perfect but it was almost $60 more than the Calphalon.

I never realized what difference a pan can make when you're making a Béchamel or Hollandaise, any sauce or gravy finishing.
I have Wolfgang Puck pans, and yes they were a set. They are awesome. They cook excellent.

I have those too! I used Revereware for years......got it as a wedding present in 1973 and used it until a few years ago. Those handles were made of a material that didn't get hot. I am still trying to remember I can't pick up a pan off the stove by it's handle anymore without a hot pad. :shock:

My MIL had an old enamel(?) Dutch Oven that had the dimpled lid. She made the most awesome roasts in that thing! You will see them in antique stores occasionally. The bottom was gray and the lid was rid.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by falvegas » Wed Jul 14, 2010 10:13 am

abbi wrote:
falvegas wrote:
Pixie wrote:
STAINLESS: 3 to 5 Multi-Ply (with aluminum or Copper Core), and 18/10 Stainless is always very much worth it, especially from a brand Manufacturer e.g. All Clad, Calphalon etc. You can use metal utensils on stainless but I'd do this only when absolutely necessary, it will scratch over time.
Calphalon is an excellent brand! It is my second favorite after All Clad! It is all aluminum, heavy, GREAT conductivity!!!!!! It's an excellent choice!
My Saucier is Calphalon, 18/10 multiply Stainless. If you ever make sauces, you'll need a pan like this or the All Clad Open Saucier. which is nearly perfect but it was almost $60 more than the Calphalon.

I never realized what difference a pan can make when you're making a Béchamel or Hollandaise, any sauce or gravy finishing.
I have Wolfgang Puck pans, and yes they were a set. They are awesome. They cook excellent.
Puck is somewhere in, Oh, on a scale of 10 he's a 6 or 7. Some of his stuff is pretty darn good, and it shoiuld last you a lifetime. Most cooks do not need professional grade cookware, but believe me, there is a difference. I've picked this stuff up in the stores, and some like, Puck, Batali and Stewart are pretty darn good. I wouild recommend ataying away from the Electrics by the notables...many of their motor driven devices are marginal...will do the job...but unlike my Kitchen Aid mixer and Cuisinart F. Processor, the'll never last 20 years.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by ConsrvYank1 » Wed Jul 14, 2010 11:15 am

falvegas wrote:
I wouild recommend ataying away from the Electrics by the notables...many of their motor driven devices are marginal...will do the job...but unlike my Kitchen Aid mixer and Cuisinart F. Processor, the'll never last 20 years.
My Kitchen Aid mixer is 36 years old and still running strong!!! :mrgreen: When I moved to South Carolina 7 years ago my son in law spray painted it red to accent my black and white kitchen. Originally is was what I call "baby puke green." :lol:

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by Pixie » Wed Jul 14, 2010 2:54 pm

falvegas wrote:
Pixie wrote:
FYI: the 18/10 is very important. 18 is the amount (%) of Chromium in the Steel. ‘0’, ‘5’. or ‘10’ is the Amount of Nickel in the steel, and that is for hardness. Several of the older 18/05 pans I had I threw out because the scratched too easily.
I had never heard of 18/05. I was aware of 18/10 and 18/08. I was taught that 18/0 is the same thing as 18/10... is that right?????
Well, it's not a law, so many of the manufacturers refuse to let you know the metallurgy unless you write to them...if then.

You'll see this on Flatware (stainless) quite a bit. The 18/10 stainless flatware I have looks like the day I bought it. Many of the others, older, look like they came from Fred's junk yard (slight exaggeration of course).

Some will actuaslly be 18/08 and claim (advertise) 18/10.


I believe that if you go to the fabricators web site , the credible manufacturers will be clearly specify the metallurgy. Like Al Clad and Calphalon. Trantamonia is one who only recently has come out with a slightly improved product line, and sometimes indicates the metallurgy. If they won't, don't buy it.
I agree one hundred percent! If the flatware isn't 18/10 I won't buy it! Especially now that I live with hard water! Wow, it's rough on dishes, flatware, pots & pans, clothing!

EVERYTHING!

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by Pixie » Wed Jul 14, 2010 4:24 pm

falvegas wrote:
Pixie wrote:
For Stews and long Braising I find Enameled Coated Cast Iron to be superior. Most especially Le Creuset, Staub, and Chantal. I have 2 of these Dutch Ovens, and they are irreplaceable for that application. The inside of the Domed lids are ‘Dimpled’ so that steam condensates evenly over the cover and drops evenly back onto the Roast. They are however, expensive, especially Le Creuset. I got a Le Creuset ‘Clone’ at Price Club, can’t tell the difference, made by Kirkland, and got it for $50 (got the last one the day they put them out). The Le Creuset’s are about $250.
The price is the reason I have never allowed myself to have one! I have always made due with my 4-1/2 quart All Clad! I have noticed "knockoffs" surfacing and I agree that they are great! I have seen them by Mario Batali, Bobby Flay, Paula Deen and my favorite the one by Lodge... another American company! I have my sights set on a red one at Bed Bath and Beyond! :lolh:

I agree they are a very, very good investment!

Batali's enameled Cast Iron products are often listed with Le Creuset. I would recommend his products because he's a true pro, not just a notable cook trying to make a fortune by selling [entire cooking pan sets for the price of a single all clad]. As you recommended, stay away from the Notables pan sets like Emeril, Deen, Puck etc. They're money makers. And you'll notice that they almost never mention the metallurgy or true construction characteristics.

The 2 cast enamel dutch ovens I have are, Kirkland (From Costco), and Martha Stewart. They're clones but beautifully constructed, identical to Le Creuset, and they were $50 and $45 respectively.

Batali is an excellent chef and so is Bobby Flay but I have my heart set on the Lodge. It is a great company and one of founding companies in the US to make cast iron pots and pans! I love that they have kept up with the times and started to enamel their cast iron pots!

I really want to support their efforts! I have my heart set on a red one!

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by falvegas » Wed Jul 14, 2010 6:30 pm

I should apologize for the pompousness in the previous posts for this topic, because I’ve rambled on about cookware using All-Clad as the reference i.e. from 1 to 10 it was the 10 (although not in all cases). There’s a lot of good cookware out there, and some are included in Sets, and I’ve looked at pretty much most of them. Some of the recent releases I may not be aware of. For example I have not looked into Todd English’s new line or that Italian woman on Food Network (great cook, don’t remember her name) who has a new line of cookware. Many of the Network Chefs have new lines of cookware that are far, far better than what they had in the past. A good example is Emeril’s new line of Hard Anodized cookware which looks far better than what he released in the past, The same goes for W. Puck who has some new lines that seem to more professional grade.

So, for what it’s worth, I’ll sort of summarize my Personal Preferences. And it’s important to note that this would be for those who frequently cook in a serious way.

Conventional
‘All-Clad’: Stainless individual and Sets range $700 to $1100, rarely on sale
‘Calphalon’: Stainless (usually $200 to $400 sale sets)
‘Cuisinart ‘: Stainless (usually $200 to $300 sale sets)
‘Analon’: or Earth Pan Hard Anodized (usually $200 to $300 sale sets)
‘Rachel Ray or W. Puck’: (depending on the set usually up to $200 to $300 per set)
(Emeril Hard Anodized series is a consideration)
‘Lodge’: Cast Iron Signature Series (a must in any Kitchen) pre seasoned, few as good.
‘Le Creuset, Batali, and Lodge’: Enameled Cast Iron, also a must in any Kitchen especially if you make a lot of Pot Roasts/Stews/Soups.

NOTE: Contrary to popular belief, I do have three Teflon pans, but not as many as I’ve thrown out in many decades.

* One is a WearEver ‘Ribbed Skillet’ that I use to Grill Fish, Burgers, Sausage, Dogs, and Chicken on the Stove top. It’s doing OK after 4 years but I baby it to death.

* The other is a 12 inch Stainless & Teflon coated Skillet that I use to Sauté veggies, make Pancakes, Crepes and the gentle like. I never Fry Chicken, Pork Chops etc or make a Gravy in this pan. I use the multi-clad Stainless or Hard Anodized pans.

* The third is a Teflon Sauce Pan, but a backup to my Stainless Calfalon Sauce Pan (Saucier), and it’s made by Tramontina. I’ve had poor luck with Tramontina in the far past, threw one of them out, but this was simply an inexpensive back-up Saucier from their new ‘high end’ product line which I use rarely, usually when there’s going to be a crowd.

I have intentionally left out Copper Cookware because I have only 2 copper pans, and I really don’t know how to properly use them. However I’m sure someone in here has that expertise and could educate us.

Bake-Ware is also not my forte. I have little Idea what I’m doing. I have Ceramic, metal and enamel metal Baking Pans N’Stuff but I use them mostly without thought. I’m no expert Baker, mostly Breads (a lot of breads), some Cakes, Pies, and Pate a Choux, that’s about it. Don’t know a thing about the Silicone stuff or in fact what I really should be using for cakes, cookies.

Regardless, someone was right. This should have been a separate topic in here. It could be moved I guess. Maybe there isn't enough interest.

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by Pixie » Wed Jul 14, 2010 9:02 pm

Not at all, not at all! Your knowledge is always appreciated! Desired, actually!

I am quick to admit that I know very little about copper pots and pans. I know that copper has the best conductivity of any pan but they are temperamental and delicate! You have to replace the tin lining and it is a very expensive process. Polishing them takes dedication and work! I have never owned a copper pan or pot but at one time I did own a copper tea kettle. It was beautiful but I was always afraid to use it... I just kept it for display. Obviously, I no longer own it! :lolh:

The Italian cook on FoodNetwork, do you mean Giada de Laurentiis???? I think she has a new line but I know nothing about it. I couldn't agree with you more about Emeril's old line of cookware, I was disappointed in the quality and the same goes for the knives he had out. I don't know too much about his new line of hard anodized cookware... as I said, I do love, love, love hard anodized cookware!

As far as enameled cast iron, I would love to own a Le Creuset or a Staub, maybe someday, I can't help but to love all things beautiful... it's my nature but Lodge is an American company that is one of the founding companies in America to make cast iron pots and pans! They are still here and I know, know, know their product is as good as the fancy French versions! I have to support the Americans!!!!!!!!! That too is in my nature! :lolh:

As far as cast iron goes... well, I have tried and tried and tried and I am useless at properly taking care of cast iron! I have given up! :lolh: :lolh: :lolh: My mother had her mother's cast iron skillet and it was perfect! She used it for everything... my sister has it but doesn't use it. I am hopeless when it comes to trying to care for a cast iron pan. I am ashamed to admit that but admit that I must!

Now bake ware, that is another story, buy good heavy bakeware. My favorite is the commercial quality silver bakeware found at Williams Sonoma and I own their cake pans, muffin tins, and jelly roll pans. I never buy "cookie sheets" as they are uni-task pans... I buy jelly roll pans as you can use them for a myriad of things. Yes, I own a Silpat and I wouldn't be without it!!!!!!! It is one of my all time favorite kitchen tools!

My favorite bakeware for pies and quick breads are the Emile Henry Artisan fluted pie plates and loaf pans... they are glazed pottery over Burgundian (France) clay so you get a beautiful crust on your pie every time!!!!!!!!!!!!

I think I got everything... anyway most importantly, I love talking about cooking and baking and there is no one I love doing it more than with the people on CC!!!!!!!!!!!!

So, I hope no one ever feels like he/she is being pompous or the other way either... not savvy enough to join in!!!!!!!!! I have learned from every single person that has ever posted in this forum and I think each one of you is the best!!!!!!!!!!!

I hope we all continue to share whatever knowledge it is we have with each other.

:thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :highfive: :highfive: :highfive:

Now... :dinner: :dinner: :dinner: :dinner: :dinner: :dinner:


:lolh:

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by ConsrvYank1 » Thu Jul 15, 2010 5:05 am

abbi wrote:
I have Wolfgang Puck pans, and yes they were a set. They are awesome. They cook excellent.
When I was 18, and newly married, the outside garbage can was full, so I put the garbage from dinner in a big Farberware stainless steel pot, and placed it on TOP of the outside garbage pail. Well, you can guess what happened. :lol:

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by Pixie » Thu Jul 15, 2010 9:26 am

Ahhhhh the mistakes made when first married and cooking on a regular bases! :lolh: Boy, I think these stories could fill a forum! :lolh:

I once put cinnamon in chili instead of chili powder! :lolh: I grabbed the wrong spice tin! :lolh:

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Re: Gas Or Electric

Post by falvegas » Thu Jul 15, 2010 9:53 am

ConsrvYank1 wrote:
abbi wrote:
I have Wolfgang Puck pans, and yes they were a set. They are awesome. They cook excellent.
When I was 18, and newly married, the outside garbage can was full, so I put the garbage from dinner in a big Farberware stainless steel pot, and placed it on TOP of the outside garbage pail. Well, you can guess what happened. :lol:
Now, now.....you were 18....I'll bet it was a Freudian Slip Up. :teehee:

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