Homemade Yogurt

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Martha
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Homemade Yogurt

Post by Martha » Wed Aug 27, 2008 6:35 pm

Many years ago, I used to make my own and it was so much better than anything you buy in the store. It's healthier and pretty easy to make, or I wouldn't consider it. I love yogurt and have decided I'm going to go back to making my own.
I found this recipe today and have to purchase a candy thermometer. Meanwhile I thought I'd share this here, in case someone else is interested.

http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.c ... ogurt.html
The seven easy steps to perfect homemade yogurt
Step 1

Assemble your 'yogurt making' equipment - which is actually far more basic than you'd expect! Yes, you can buy a yogurt maker - and yes, it may make things a little easier. But it's by no means essential - we regularly prepare our own yogurt and have NEVER used one!
Here's what you'll need...

32 fl oz (equivalent to 1 quart or 1 litre) whole milk. Your baby needs fats in his diet, so using whole milk when making his yogurt is important. For other family members, you may prefer to use a reduced fat variety.
2tbsp natural, unflavoured yogurt. Take the yogurt out of the refrigerator about 15-30 mins before you start, so that it's as near as possible to room temperature when you add it to the milk.
A large pot with a lid.
A food thermometer (it needs to include temperatures from 110 to 180 deg F - a candy or sugar thermometer is perfect).
A large spoon.
Please note that the quantities of milk and yogurt shown here are just to illustrate the proportions you'll need. You can double or even treble the quantities if you wish.

Step 2

Fill the pot with water, boil for a few minutes, then add the spoon and thermometer. This sterilizes your equipment and ensures a better end result.

Step 3

Empty the pot, then pour in the milk. Gently warm it to a temperature of 185 deg F, to kill any 'bad' bacteria it may contain (these can have an adverse effect on the finished product). Watch the pot closely and be careful not to burn the milk!

Step 4

Remove the pot from the heat and set aside. You need to cool the milk to between 110 and 115 deg F, because these are the temperatures between which the live bacteria will efficiently ferment the milk.

It is possible to spped up this step by sitting the pot in a larger pot full of ice. But - unless you're willing to stir the pot every minute or two to ensure even cooling - we wouldn't recommend this and find it easier to allow the milk to cool by itself.

Step 5

Thoroughly stir the yogurt into the milk, then immediately place the lid on the pot. Move the pot at once to a warm place, where you can leave it - undisturbed - for a minimum of six hours.

There are two important rules to obey at this point to guarantee a good yogurt...
Keep the pot at a constant temperature of between 110 and 115 deg F. The live bacteria will become inactive at lower or higher temperatures.
Don't move the pot at all, or stir the fermenting milk. This slows down the process and you may be disappointed with your results at the end of the waiting time!
How to keep the pot at a consistent temperature...

Most ovens do not have a low enough heat setting for producing yogurt, so here are a few other methods to try:
Sit the pot in an oven warmed by the pilot light alone - our pilot light burns fiercely, so this works well for us!
Sit the pot on an electric warming pad (like the ones you use for back pain). You may need to experiment a little with the heat settings!
Wrap the pot in a very thick blanket - if this isn't warm enough, sit the wrapped pot in a cooler for extra insulation.
Put the pot in the airing cupboard/boiler closet.


Step 6

After a minimum of 6 hours, take a look at your yogurt. The longer you leave the yogurt, the thicker it will become (and the more 'tangy' it will taste!). We actually find 7 hours to be the perfect length of time.

Now - you may find that the yogurt doesn't look quite the way you were expecting it to!

It will probably have a 'layer' of liquid on top of milk curds - and the liquid may even look a little yellow. Don't worry - this is totally normal! Just mix the curds and the liquid together (although it's OK to spoon the liquid off if you prefer!).

The yogurt will be thinner in consistency than store-bought yogurts - but that's because they tend to contain additional thickeners and YOUR yogurt is 100% natural! Remember - you can make it a little thicker next time by allowing it to ferment for longer.

Step 7

Pour your homemade yogurt into suitable containers with lids, then refrigerate. Refrigeration actually stops the bacteria in the yogurt from creating any more lactic acid - that's why the yogurt doesn't ferment and thicken any further. You can store it for up to a week in the refrigerator.

Voila! Your homemade yogurt is ready... wasn't that easy?

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ConsrvYank1
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Re: Homemade Yogurt

Post by ConsrvYank1 » Wed Aug 27, 2008 7:17 pm

Martha wrote:Many years ago, I used to make my own and it was so much better than anything you buy in the store. It's healthier and pretty easy to make, or I wouldn't consider it. I love yogurt and have decided I'm going to go back to making my own.
I found this recipe today and have to purchase a candy thermometer. Meanwhile I thought I'd share this here, in case someone else is interested.

http://www.homemade-baby-food-recipes.c ... ogurt.html
The seven easy steps to perfect homemade yogurt
Step 1

Assemble your 'yogurt making' equipment - which is actually far more basic than you'd expect! Yes, you can buy a yogurt maker - and yes, it may make things a little easier. But it's by no means essential - we regularly prepare our own yogurt and have NEVER used one!
Here's what you'll need...

32 fl oz (equivalent to 1 quart or 1 litre) whole milk. Your baby needs fats in his diet, so using whole milk when making his yogurt is important. For other family members, you may prefer to use a reduced fat variety.
2tbsp natural, unflavoured yogurt. Take the yogurt out of the refrigerator about 15-30 mins before you start, so that it's as near as possible to room temperature when you add it to the milk.
A large pot with a lid.
A food thermometer (it needs to include temperatures from 110 to 180 deg F - a candy or sugar thermometer is perfect).
A large spoon.
Please note that the quantities of milk and yogurt shown here are just to illustrate the proportions you'll need. You can double or even treble the quantities if you wish.

Step 2

Fill the pot with water, boil for a few minutes, then add the spoon and thermometer. This sterilizes your equipment and ensures a better end result.

Step 3

Empty the pot, then pour in the milk. Gently warm it to a temperature of 185 deg F, to kill any 'bad' bacteria it may contain (these can have an adverse effect on the finished product). Watch the pot closely and be careful not to burn the milk!

Step 4

Remove the pot from the heat and set aside. You need to cool the milk to between 110 and 115 deg F, because these are the temperatures between which the live bacteria will efficiently ferment the milk.

It is possible to spped up this step by sitting the pot in a larger pot full of ice. But - unless you're willing to stir the pot every minute or two to ensure even cooling - we wouldn't recommend this and find it easier to allow the milk to cool by itself.

Step 5

Thoroughly stir the yogurt into the milk, then immediately place the lid on the pot. Move the pot at once to a warm place, where you can leave it - undisturbed - for a minimum of six hours.

There are two important rules to obey at this point to guarantee a good yogurt...
Keep the pot at a constant temperature of between 110 and 115 deg F. The live bacteria will become inactive at lower or higher temperatures.
Don't move the pot at all, or stir the fermenting milk. This slows down the process and you may be disappointed with your results at the end of the waiting time!
How to keep the pot at a consistent temperature...

Most ovens do not have a low enough heat setting for producing yogurt, so here are a few other methods to try:
Sit the pot in an oven warmed by the pilot light alone - our pilot light burns fiercely, so this works well for us!
Sit the pot on an electric warming pad (like the ones you use for back pain). You may need to experiment a little with the heat settings!
Wrap the pot in a very thick blanket - if this isn't warm enough, sit the wrapped pot in a cooler for extra insulation.
Put the pot in the airing cupboard/boiler closet.


Step 6

After a minimum of 6 hours, take a look at your yogurt. The longer you leave the yogurt, the thicker it will become (and the more 'tangy' it will taste!). We actually find 7 hours to be the perfect length of time.

Now - you may find that the yogurt doesn't look quite the way you were expecting it to!

It will probably have a 'layer' of liquid on top of milk curds - and the liquid may even look a little yellow. Don't worry - this is totally normal! Just mix the curds and the liquid together (although it's OK to spoon the liquid off if you prefer!).

The yogurt will be thinner in consistency than store-bought yogurts - but that's because they tend to contain additional thickeners and YOUR yogurt is 100% natural! Remember - you can make it a little thicker next time by allowing it to ferment for longer.

Step 7

Pour your homemade yogurt into suitable containers with lids, then refrigerate. Refrigeration actually stops the bacteria in the yogurt from creating any more lactic acid - that's why the yogurt doesn't ferment and thicken any further. You can store it for up to a week in the refrigerator.

Voila! Your homemade yogurt is ready... wasn't that easy?
Easy? ha,ha,ha,ha

I wouldn't have the patience to read the recipe, let alone make it. If I did it would have to be for something better than yogurt. Sorry Martha, maybe somebody else will find it worth the effort. :mrgreen:

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Martha
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Post by Martha » Wed Aug 27, 2008 7:51 pm

:lolh: I never looked at it that way. It does take time, but once you have the ingredients (like five of them) your pretty well set. I used to make mayo too - I can't imagine why I did that :lol: one of my pioneer woman phases.

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Post by College Boy » Wed Aug 27, 2008 8:05 pm

Martha wrote::lolh: I never looked at it that way. It does take time, but once you have the ingredients (like five of them) your pretty well set. I used to make mayo too - I can't imagine why I did that :lol: one of my pioneer woman phases.
I bet that the pioneers didn't even use mayo given what happens if it is not eaten right away and their lack of refrigeration or even ice.

-Mike

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JannyMae
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Post by JannyMae » Wed Aug 27, 2008 8:34 pm

college boy wrote:
Martha wrote::lolh: I never looked at it that way. It does take time, but once you have the ingredients (like five of them) your pretty well set. I used to make mayo too - I can't imagine why I did that :lol: one of my pioneer woman phases.
I bet that the pioneers didn't even use mayo given what happens if it is not eaten right away and their lack of refrigeration or even ice.

-Mike
That's a bit of a myth, actually. The lemon juice in the mayo helps preserve it. I still don't think it would be suitable for the pioneers, though!

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Post by JannyMae » Wed Aug 27, 2008 8:36 pm

The yogurt will be thinner in consistency than store-bought yogurts - but that's because they tend to contain additional thickeners and YOUR yogurt is 100% natural! Remember - you can make it a little thicker next time by allowing it to ferment for longer.
How thin is it? Is it like milk, or is it like Dannon? I like mine more custardy. How thick can you get it?

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Martha
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Post by Martha » Wed Aug 27, 2008 9:07 pm

Good grief, I guess I have to watch my words very carefully around here. The fact police are lurking. If you're interested in making yogurt, I shared a recipe. That's what this thread is about. :roll:

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Pixie
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Post by Pixie » Thu Aug 28, 2008 3:23 am

:wave: Martha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I love yogurt!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! Here's a recipe almost identical to the one my father used!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! I'll see if I can find his and type it up!!!!!!!!!

:)

In Greek: γιαούρτι, pronounced yee-ah-OOR-tee
This is a basic recipe for homemade yogurt using commercial full fat milk.

Ingredients:

• 1 quart of full fat sheep or cow's milk (pasteurized)
• 2 tablespoons of previously homemade yogurt or plain unflavored yogurt at room temperature
• 2 tablespoons of full fat milk (same type) at room temperature

Preparation:

1. Heat the milk just to the boiling point and pour into a non-metal container.
2. Let cool to lukewarm (100-105F). A skin will form on top.
3. Mix the 2 tablespoons of yogurt (homemade or commercial) with 2 tablespoons of milk.
4. Add to the lukewarm mixture, carefully pouring down the side so that any skin that may have formed on top is not disturbed.
5. Cover with a clean dishtowel and place on another towel in a warm, dry place for at least 12 hours (or overnight) until it thickens.

Note: 12 hours is best. The longer the yogurt coagulates beyond that time, the more tangy the taste becomes.

6. Carefully drain any excess liquid.
7. Refrigerate for 4 hours before using.
8. Store in the refrigerator and use within 4-5 days.
9. Don't forget to save a small amount to make the next batch.



Sheep's milk is important for Greek yogurt!!!!!!!!!!! It adds the unique tanginess that Greek yogurt has and for those of you who like your yogurt thick... you'll like this recipe!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

:)

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Martha
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Post by Martha » Thu Aug 28, 2008 4:08 am

What would I do without you Pixie? Bless you. This one sounds much easier than the recipe I found. Now where the heck am I going to get sheep's milk - are you serious? How about goats milk - or just regular milk?
Oh never mind, I see you allow me to use cow's milk. I cannot wait to try this. You're a doll!

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Post by Pixie » Thu Aug 28, 2008 8:13 am

Image Martha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Oh, I'm so sorry I forgot to add that!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

You can find Sheep's Milk at most Whole Foods stores... if you have them by you, if not, call around to all the health food stores and Greek, Armenian, Serbian, etc markets that may be by you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

If not you can use Goat's Milk (2nd best) or Heavy Whipping Cream (if you have to)!!!!!!!!!!!!

I love you Martha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

:givehug: :givehug: :givehug:

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Post by tattulip » Thu Aug 28, 2008 8:58 am

Martha wrote:Good grief, I guess I have to watch my words very carefully around here. The fact police are lurking. If you're interested in making yogurt, I shared a recipe. That's what this thread is about. :roll:
Don't worry about collegeboy - he just has a droll sense of humor. Thanks for the yogurt recipe. I may try that someday.

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Post by JannyMae » Thu Aug 28, 2008 10:12 am

Martha wrote:Good grief, I guess I have to watch my words very carefully around here. The fact police are lurking. If you're interested in making yogurt, I shared a recipe. That's what this thread is about. :roll:
Could you please answer my question? I'm interested in your recipe.
Thanks.
JannyMae wrote:
The yogurt will be thinner in consistency than store-bought yogurts - but that's because they tend to contain additional thickeners and YOUR yogurt is 100% natural! Remember - you can make it a little thicker next time by allowing it to ferment for longer.
How thin is it? Is it like milk, or is it like Dannon? I like mine more custardy. How thick can you get it?

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Post by Martha » Thu Aug 28, 2008 10:49 am

Sorry Janny, it's been so long since I made it I don't remember. But the recipe says:
After a minimum of 6 hours, take a look at your yogurt. The longer you leave the yogurt, the thicker it will become (and the more 'tangy' it will taste!). We actually find 7 hours to be the perfect length of time.

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Post by JannyMae » Thu Aug 28, 2008 11:08 am

Martha wrote:Sorry Janny, it's been so long since I made it I don't remember. But the recipe says:
After a minimum of 6 hours, take a look at your yogurt. The longer you leave the yogurt, the thicker it will become (and the more 'tangy' it will taste!). We actually find 7 hours to be the perfect length of time.
Okay, thanks!

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Post by ToBeannounced » Fri Aug 29, 2008 4:35 pm

A friend of mine makes her own and the process involves straining it through cheesecloth. I don't think she uses store-bought yogurt to start it with either but then she's a biochem phd, she could probably find a way to make cupcakes out of uranium.

:laugh:

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Post by ConsrvYank1 » Fri Aug 29, 2008 5:29 pm

ToBeannounced wrote:A friend of mine makes her own and the process involves straining it through cheesecloth. I don't think she uses store-bought yogurt to start it with either but then she's a biochem phd, she could probably find a way to make cupcakes out of uranium.

:laugh:
I would love to see that recipe. :lol:

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Post by ToBeannounced » Fri Aug 29, 2008 8:31 pm

ConsrvYank1 wrote:
ToBeannounced wrote:A friend of mine makes her own and the process involves straining it through cheesecloth. I don't think she uses store-bought yogurt to start it with either but then she's a biochem phd, she could probably find a way to make cupcakes out of uranium.

:laugh:
I would love to see that recipe. :lol:
Easy. Just mix it up, put it in the oven. It goes "kaboom". Gets blowed up real good.

:lolh:

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