Toad in The Hole

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Royd
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Toad in The Hole

Post by Royd » Wed Dec 19, 2007 9:24 am

Another winter classic is Toad in the Hole.

http://www.deliaonline.com/recipes/toad ... 30,RC.html



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StarryNightDave
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Post by StarryNightDave » Wed Dec 19, 2007 10:11 am

Is there a website that explains where all of these British dishes got their names?

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tattulip
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Post by tattulip » Wed Dec 19, 2007 11:08 am

StarryNightDave wrote:Is there a website that explains where all of these British dishes got their names?

.......or one that explains the British jargon?
When the toad is ready, it should be puffed brown and crisp and the centre should look cooked and not too squidgy.
Squidgy? :shock:

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Royd
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Post by Royd » Wed Dec 19, 2007 12:53 pm

Squidgy
If too squidgy it will be ikcy, even cacky.

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Royd
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Post by Royd » Wed Dec 19, 2007 1:10 pm

StarryNightDave wrote:Is there a website that explains where all of these British dishes got their names?
More tasty treats to come

Aberdeen Nips
Beef Cecils
Black Pudding
Bubble and Squeak
Clapshot
Cullen Skink
Dean's Cream
Fitless Cock
Flummery
Girdle Sponges
Hob Nobs
Huffkins
Hunter's Buns
Love in Disguise
Inky Pinky
Knickerbocker Glory
Marmite
Priddy Oggies
Scouse
Singing Hinnies
Slot
Wet Nelly
Wow-Wow Sauce

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StarryNightDave
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Post by StarryNightDave » Wed Dec 19, 2007 2:06 pm

:rofl: :rofl: Is it any wonder that England has produced comedians like Benny Hill, Mr. Bean, and the Monty Python crew? ? ?

Fitles cock? Say no more! :shock: :lol:

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annie
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Post by annie » Fri Dec 21, 2007 2:42 pm

Royd wrote:
StarryNightDave wrote:Is there a website that explains where all of these British dishes got their names?
More tasty treats to come

Aberdeen Nips
Beef Cecils
Black Pudding
Bubble and Squeak
Clapshot
Cullen Skink
Dean's Cream
Fitless Cock
Flummery
Girdle Sponges
Hob Nobs
Huffkins
Hunter's Buns
Love in Disguise
Inky Pinky
Knickerbocker Glory
Marmite
Priddy Oggies
Scouse
Singing Hinnies
Slot
Wet Nelly
Wow-Wow Sauce
:rofl:

Please, Royd, I must know the recipe for Love in Disguise and a good
recipe for Scouse - Scouse with lamb please.

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Royd
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Post by Royd » Fri Dec 21, 2007 3:29 pm

Scouse :)

http://www.scouser.com/scouse-recipe/

Scouse was brought to Liverpool by Northern European sailors, it was originally called Labskause. This was finally shortened to Skause and over time the spelling changed to the more Anglicised version we have today, Scouse.

The people who ate Scouse were all generally sailors and their families and eventually all sailors within Liverpool were referred to as Scousers. Time has now taken its turn and everyone from the region of Liverpool is known as a Scouser.

Scouse holds a place in the heart of most Liverpudlian's as the taste of their hometown and is still regulary eaten today by a great number of families, including my own.

There are records showing that it was also served to the inmates of the Birkenhead workshouse way back in 1864. The recipe was much simpler then than today's refined version but was predominatly the same staple ingredients - meat, vegatables and potatoes.

Scouse can be ready made and kept for up to 2 days. Keep it covered in a refrigerator and reheat in a saucepan. Most people prefer the added depth of flavour that reheating adds.

Blind scouse was a variation on the above recipe and was eaten by the poorer people as it was cheaper to make because it did not contain meat

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Royd
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Post by Royd » Fri Dec 21, 2007 3:30 pm

http://thefoody.com/meat/loveindisguise.html

900g (2lb) Pigs' hearts
110g (4oz) Fresh breadcrumbs
15oz Tin of tomatoes
50g (2oz) Butter
25g (1oz) Flour (well-seasoned)
1 Onion
1 Egg beaten with 2 tbsp Milk
2 Lemons (zest only)
2 tsp Wine vinegar
Bay leaves
4 tbsp Parsley
French mustard
Beef stock
Few spoonfuls yoghurt (optional)

Wash the hearts and trim away waste - (fat, membrane, gristle and arteries).
Soak in lightly salted water for 10 minutes then rinse, drain and dry well.
Finely chop the onion and soften it in 1 oz butter.
Remove from the heat stir in the breadcrumbs, lemon zest, the chopped parsley season well.
Bind with the egg and milk.
Use the mixture to stuff the heart, and secure the openings with cocktail.
Blend the tomatoes in a blender, stir in the vinegar and add enough stock to make up to 1 pint.
Dust the hearts with the well-seasoned flour.
Melt 1 oz butter in a flameproof casserole, stir in the leftover flour and allow to brown.
Add the tomato mixture and make a smooth, bubbling hot sauce.
Lay the prepared hearts in the sauce and tuck the bay leaves among them.
Preheat oven to 170°C: 325°F: Gas 3.
Cover with greaseproof paper and the lid, and cook for 1 hour.
Turn the hearts gently and continue cooking for 1 to 1½ hours further until tender.
Transfer the hearts to a warmed serving dish.
Stir the mustard into the sauce, add salt and pepper to taste and carefully blend in the yoghurt if used.
Pour the sauce over the hearts, garnish with chopped parsley and serve with boiled potatoes.
Serves 6

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